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De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum: An Experimental Investigation

Author

Listed:
  • Utteeyo Dasgupta

    (Wagner College)

  • Lata Gangadharan

    (Monash University)

  • Pushkar Maitra

    (Monash University)

  • Subha Mani

    (Fordham University)

Abstract

The goal of this paper is to examine stability in preferences using the Stigler-Becker state-dependent framework. Using a randomized intervention that changes the opportunity sets of individuals we construct a unique panel data from an artefactual field experiment and evaluate whether the change in the state space influences our selected indicators of preferences: risk, competitiveness, and confidence. We find that there is considerable heterogeneity of preferences across individuals at a point in time; risk and competitive preferences inter-temporally are consistent with state-dependent preferences, while measures of confidence seem to depend on past experiences.

Suggested Citation

  • Utteeyo Dasgupta & Lata Gangadharan & Pushkar Maitra & Subha Mani, 2014. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum: An Experimental Investigation," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2014-07, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:frd:wpaper:dp2014-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chuang, Yating & Schechter, Laura, 2015. "Stability of experimental and survey measures of risk, time, and social preferences: A review and some new results," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 151-170.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Preference stability; State Contingent Preferences; Artefactual Field Experiment.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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