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Randomizing the "Last Mile": A methodological note on using a voucher-based approach to assess the impact of infrastructure projects

  • Bernard, Tanguy
  • Torero, Maximo

This methodological note discusses the potential and limits of using voucher-based experiments to randomly evaluate the micro-level impact of infrastructures on households' well-being. We argue that such methods are policy relevant, statistically robust, and ethically correct. A number of conditions regarding the vouchers' design and level, as well as allocation methods and household sampling, must be taken into account, however. We illustrate the discussion with an ongoing voucher-based impact evaluation of a rural electrification program in Ethiopia.

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1078.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1078
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  12. Sobel, Michael E., 2006. "What Do Randomized Studies of Housing Mobility Demonstrate?: Causal Inference in the Face of Interference," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 101, pages 1398-1407, December.
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  16. Jenny Aker, 2008. "Does Digital Divide or Provide? The Impact of Cell Phones on Grain Markets in Niger," Working Papers 154, Center for Global Development.
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