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Land lease markets and agricultural efficiency: theory and evidence from Ethiopia

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  • Pender, John L.
  • Fafchamps, Marcel

Abstract

This paper develops a theoretical model of land leasing that includes transaction costs of enforcing labor effort, risk pooling motives and non-tradable productive inputs. We test the implications of this model compared to those of the “Marshallian” (unenforceable labor effort) and “New School” (costlessly enforceable effort) perspectives using data collected from four villages in Ethiopia. We find that land lease markets operate relatively efficiently in the villages studied, supporting the New School perspective relative to the other two models. Land contract choice is found to depend upon the social relationships between landlords and tenants, but differences in contracts are not associated with significant differences in input use or output value per hectare. We find that other household and village characteristics do affect input use and output value, suggesting imperfections in other factor markets. These results imply that interventions to improve the functioning of land lease markets are likely to be of little benefit for agricultural efficiency in the villages studied, whereas improvements in other factor markets may be more beneficial.

Suggested Citation

  • Pender, John L. & Fafchamps, Marcel, 2001. "Land lease markets and agricultural efficiency: theory and evidence from Ethiopia," EPTD discussion papers 81, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:eptddp:81
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    1. Pender, John L. & Fafchamps, Marcel, 2001. "Land lease markets and agricultural efficiency: theory and evidence from Ethiopia," EPTD discussion papers 81, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Deininger, Klaus & Jin, Songqing, 2006. "Tenure security and land-related investment: Evidence from Ethiopia," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1245-1277, July.
    2. Jabbar, Mohammad & Ayele, Gezahyegn, 2011. "Land degradation in the Oromiya highlands in Ethiopia," Research Reports 208727, International Livestock Research Institute.
    3. Pender, John L. & Fafchamps, Marcel, 2001. "Land lease markets and agricultural efficiency: theory and evidence from Ethiopia," EPTD discussion papers 81, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Benin, Samuel & Place, Frank & Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Pender, John L., 2006. "Land Markets and Agricultural Land Use Efficiency and Sustainability: Evidence from East Africa," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25645, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Muraoka, Rie & Jin, Songqing & Jayne, Thomas S., 2014. "Land Access, Land Rental and Food Security: Evidence from Kenya," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170244, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Paul J. Block & Kenneth Strzepek & Mark W. Rosegrant & Xinshen Diao, 2008. "Impacts of considering climate variability on investment decisions in Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(2), pages 171-181, September.
    7. Jacoby, Hanan G. & Mansuri, Ghazala, 2006. "Incomplete contracts and investment : a study of land tenancy in Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3826, The World Bank.
    8. Ndoye Niane, Aifa Fatimata & Burger, Kees & Bulte, Erwin H., 2010. "Horticultural Households Profit Optimization and the Efficiency of Labour Contract Choice," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 95776, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    9. Menale Kassie & Stein Holden, 2007. "Sharecropping efficiency in Ethiopia: threats of eviction and kinship," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(2-3), pages 179-188, September.
    10. Stein Holden & Hailu Yohannes, 2002. "Land Redistribution, Tenure Insecurity, and Intensity of Production: A Study of Farm Households in Southern Ethiopia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(4), pages 573-590.
    11. Gruère, Guillaume P., 2006. "An analysis of trade related international regulations of genetically modified food and their effects on developing countries:," EPTD discussion papers 147, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Feng, Shuyi & Heerink, Nico & Ruben, Ruerd & Qu, Futian, 2010. "Land rental market, off-farm employment and agricultural production in Southeast China: A plot-level case study," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 598-606, December.
    13. Liverpool, Lenis Saweda O. & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2010. "Asset versus consumption poverty and poverty dynamics in the presence of multiple equilibria in rural Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 971, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Tefera, B. & Ayele, Gezahegn & Atnafe, Y. & Jabbar, Mohammad A. & Dubale, P., 2002. "Nature and causes of land degradation in Oromiya region, Ethiopia – a review," Research Reports 182886, International Livestock Research Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Land use Ethiopia.; Agriculture Economic aspects Egypt.;

    JEL classification:

    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • P - Economic Systems

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