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The impact of local predatory lending laws

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  • Giang Ho
  • Anthony Pennington-Cross

Abstract

Local authorities in North Carolina, and subsequently in at least 23 other states, have enacted laws intending to reduce predatory and abusive lending. While there is substantial variation in the laws, they typically extend the coverage of the Federal Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act (HOEPA) by including home purchase and open-end mortgage credit, by lowering annual percentage rate (APR) and fees and points triggers, and by prohibiting or restricting the use of balloon payments and prepayment penalties. This paper provides a detailed summary of various local predatory lending laws that are effective as of the end of 2004. We also create an index that captures differences in the strength of the local laws along the two important dimensions of coverage and restrictions. In addition, our univariate results show that there is substantial heterogeneity in the observed market responses to the local laws.

Suggested Citation

  • Giang Ho & Anthony Pennington-Cross, 2005. "The impact of local predatory lending laws," Working Papers 2005-049, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2005-049
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    File URL: http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/2005/2005-049.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marsha J. Courchane & Brian J. Surette & Peter M. Zorn, 2004. "Subprime Borrowers: Mortgage Transitions and Outcomes," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 365-392, December.
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    3. Paul S. Calem & Kevin Gillen & Susan Wachter, 2004. "The Neighborhood Distribution of Subprime Mortgage Lending," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 393-410, December.
    4. Keith D. Harvey & Peter J. Nigro, 2004. "Do Predatory Lending Laws Influence Mortgage Lending? An Analysis of the North Carolina Predatory Lending Law," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 435-456, December.
    5. Gregory Elliehausen & Michael E. Staten, 2004. "Regulation of Subprime Mortgage Products: An Analysis of North Carolina's Predatory Lending Law," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 411-433, December.
    6. Brent W. Ambrose & Michael LaCour-Little & Anthony B. Sanders, 2004. "The Effect of Conforming Loan Status on Mortgage Yield Spreads: A Loan Level Analysis," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 32(4), pages 541-569, December.
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    8. Pennington-Cross, Anthony, 2003. "Credit History and the Performance of Prime and Nonprime Mortgages," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 279-301, November.
    9. Brent Ambrose & Anthony Sanders, 2004. "Legal Restrictions in Personal Loan Markets," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 133-151, November.
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    11. Karen M. Pence, 2003. "Foreclosing on opportunity: state laws and mortgage credit," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2003-16, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    Cited by:

    1. Dan S. Rickman & Mouhcine Guettabi, 2015. "The Great Recession And Nonmetropolitan America," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(1), pages 93-112, January.
    2. Ho, Giang & Pennington-Cross, Anthony, 2006. "The impact of local predatory lending laws on the flow of subprime credit," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 210-228, September.
    3. Francisca Richter, 2008. "An analysis of foreclosure rate differentials in soft markets," Working Paper 0811, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    4. Whalen, Gary W., 2008. "The impact of preemption of the Georgia Fair Lending Act by the OCC on national and state banks and the dual banking system," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 772-791, November.
    5. Anthony Pennington-Cross & Giang Ho, 2008. "Predatory Lending Laws and the Cost of Credit," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, pages 175-211.
    6. Giang Ho & Anthony Pennington-Cross, 2007. "The varying effects of predatory lending laws on high-cost mortgage applications," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 39-60.
    7. Elliehausen, Gregory & Staten, Michael E. & Steinbuks, Jevgenijs, 2008. "The effect of prepayment penalties on the pricing of subprime mortgages," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 33-46.

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    Keywords

    Predatory lending ; Mortgages ; Banking law ; Home equity loans;

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