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Taxation and the Taylor principle

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  • Rochelle M. Edge
  • Jeremy B. Rudd

Abstract

We add a nominal tax system to a sticky-price monetary business cycle model. When nominal interest income is taxed, the coefficient on inflation in a Taylor-type monetary policy rule must be significantly larger than one in order for the model economy to have a determinate rational expectations equilibrium. When depreciation is treated as a charge against taxable income, an even larger weight on inflation is required in the Taylor rule in order to obtain a determinate and stable equilibrium. These results have obvious implications for assessing the historical conduct of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Rochelle M. Edge & Jeremy B. Rudd, 2002. "Taxation and the Taylor principle," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-51, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2002-51
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Martin Feldstein, 1982. "Inflation, Capital Taxation, and Monetary Policy," NBER Chapters,in: Inflation: Causes and Effects, pages 153-168 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Darrel Cohen & Kevin Hassett & R. Glenn Hubbard, 1999. "Inflation and the User Cost of Capital: Does Inflation Still Matter?," NBER Chapters,in: The Costs and Benefits of Price Stability, pages 199-234 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Kahn, Charles M, 1980. "The Solution of Linear Difference Models under Rational Expectations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(5), pages 1305-1311, July.
    6. Kimball, Miles S, 1995. "The Quantitative Analytics of the Basic Neomonetarist Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1241-1277, November.
    7. Martin Feldstein, 1982. "Capital Taxation," NBER Working Papers 0877, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gavin, William T. & Kydland, Finn E. & Pakko, Michael R., 2007. "Monetary policy, taxes, and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1587-1611, September.
    2. McKnight, Stephen, 2017. "Are Consumption Taxes Preferable To Income Taxes For Preventing Macroeconomic Instability?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(04), pages 1023-1058, June.
    3. Stefano Eusepi & Bruce Preston, 2008. "Stabilizing Expectations under Monetary and Fiscal Policy Coordination," NBER Working Papers 14391, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Leith, Campbell & von Thadden, Leopold, 2008. "Monetary and fiscal policy interactions in a New Keynesian model with capital accumulation and non-Ricardian consumers," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 279-313, May.
    5. Tommy Sveen & Lutz Weinke, 2004. "Firm-specific investment, sticky prices and the Taylor principle," Economics Working Papers 780, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    6. Marattin, Luigi & Marzo, Massimiliano & Zagaglia, Paolo, 2011. "A welfare perspective on the fiscal–monetary policy mix: The role of alternative fiscal instruments," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 920-952.
    7. Jordi Galí & J. David López Salido & Javier Vallés, 2003. "Rule-of-thumb consumers and the design of interest rate rules," Working Papers 0320, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    8. Franke, Reiner & Flaschel, Peter, 2008. "A Proof of Determinacy in the New-Keynesian Sticky Wages and Prices Model," Economics Working Papers 2008-14, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    9. William Gavin & Benjamin Keen & Finn Kydland, 2015. "Monetary Policy, the Tax Code, and the Real Effects of Energy Shocks," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(3), pages 694-707, July.
    10. Jukka Railavo, 2004. "Effects of the supply-side channel on stabilisation properties of policy rules," Macroeconomics 0404028, EconWPA.
    11. Kwapil, Claudia & Scharler, Johann, 2010. "Interest rate pass-through, monetary policy rules and macroeconomic stability," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 236-251, March.
    12. Alessandro Piergallini & Giorgio Rodano, 2012. "Public Debt, Distortionary Taxation, and Monetary Policy," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 225-248.
    13. Kühn Stefan & Muysken Joan & Veen Tom van, 2009. "The Adverse Effects of Government Spending on Private Consumption in New Keynesian Models," Research Memorandum 004, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    14. Moura, Marcelo L. & de Carvalho, Alexandre, 2010. "What can Taylor rules say about monetary policy in Latin America?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 392-404, March.
    15. Fabrizio Mattesini & Lorenza Rossi, 2012. "Monetary Policy and Automatic Stabilizers: The Role of Progressive Taxation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44(5), pages 825-862, August.
    16. Gisle James Natvik, 2009. "Government Spending and the Taylor Principle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(1), pages 57-77, February.
    17. Seiya Fujisaki & Kazuo Mino, 2008. "Income Taxation, Interest-Rate Control and Macroeconomic Stability with Balanced-Budget," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 08-20, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    18. Jukka Railavo, 2004. "Stability consequences of fiscal policy rules," Macroeconomics 0404020, EconWPA.
    19. Sveen, Tommy & Weinke, Lutz, 2007. "Firm-specific capital, nominal rigidities, and the Taylor principle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 729-737, September.
    20. Rochelle M. Edge & Jeremy B. Rudd, 2005. "Temporary partial expensing in a general-equilibrium model," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2005-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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    Keywords

    Monetary policy ; Inflation (Finance);

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