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Technology and job retention among young adults, 1980-98

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  • Madeline Zavodny

Abstract

Although many studies have examined whether job stability and security have declined over time, the role of technology in job turnover has received little attention. This analysis examines the relationship between the likelihood that a worker remains at the same job for two years and various measures of technology usage across industries. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth over 1980-98, the results indicate that the relationship between job retention and technology varies across measures of technology. Almost all of the relationship between job retention likelihoods and technology is due to quits, not to involuntary job loss. The results suggest that the relationship between technology, quits, and involuntary job loss differs between college graduates and less-educated workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Madeline Zavodny, 2000. "Technology and job retention among young adults, 1980-98," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2000-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedawp:2000-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Labor turnover ; Technology ; Employment (Economic theory) ; Demography;

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