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Instant Efficient Pollution Abatement under Non-Linear Taxation and Asymmetric Information: The Differential Tax Revisited

  • Paul Mensink

    (Independent)

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    This paper analyzes incentives for polluting firms to exchange abatement cost information under the non-linear pollution tax scheme (‘differential tax’) introduced by Kim and Chang [J. Regul. Econom. 5, 1993, 193-197]. It shows that polluting firms have - under mild conditions - an incentive to join a coalition whose members mutually truthfully exchange information as well as commit themselves with respect to their abatement decisions. As a result, the differential tax triggers instantly - i.e. no abatement adaptation is needed – efficient abatement levels without the regulator knowing marginal abatement costs. Consequently, this paper shows that differential taxation results in lower social costs than traditional non-linear taxation which triggers efficient emissions only after a period of non-efficient abatement.

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    File URL: http://www.feem.it/userfiles/attach/Publication/NDL2004/NDL2004-124.pdf
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    Paper provided by Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei in its series Working Papers with number 2004.124.

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    Date of creation: Oct 2004
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    Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2004.124
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    1. Dasgupta, Partha & Hammond, Peter & Maskin, Eric, 1980. "On Imperfect Information and Optimal Pollution Control," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(5), pages 857-60, October.
    2. Livernois, J. & Karp, L., 1992. "Using Automatic Tax Changes to Control Pollution Emissions," Working Papers 1992-12, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
    3. Bulckaen, Fabrizio, 1997. "Emissions Charge and Asymmetric Information: Consistently a Problem?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 100-106, September.
    4. Wilson, Robert B, 1978. "Information, Efficiency, and the Core of an Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(4), pages 807-16, July.
    5. Louis Kaplow & Steven Shavell, 2002. "On the Superiority of Corrective Taxes to Quantity Regulation," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(1), pages 1-17, January.
    6. Kwerel, Evan, 1977. "To Tell the Truth: Imperfect Information and Optimal Pollution Control," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 595-601, October.
    7. Ross McKitrick, 1999. "A Cournot Mechanism for Pollution Control under Asymmetric Information," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 14(3), pages 353-363, October.
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