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Cultural Norms and Identity in Coordination Games

Author

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  • Jo Laban Peryman

    (RMIT University, Melbourne)

  • David Kelsey

    (Department of Economics, University of Exeter)

Abstract

We run experiments with a stag hunt and bargaining coordination game. Using a between-subjects design, we vary the identity of the opponent between someone of the same culture or a different culture. The idea is to see whether cultural norms or identity play a part in coordination decisions. We compare the responses of British and Asian students at the University of Exeter and show the cultural identity of the opponent by physical appearance. The players appear to use cultural stereotypes to predict behaviour, especially in the bargaining game which may require more strategic thought than the stag hunt game. In particular, the British act in way that indicates they believe the Asians will behave more cautiously than other British. According to our results, the stereotype of Asians being cautious is misleading.

Suggested Citation

  • Jo Laban Peryman & David Kelsey, 2015. "Cultural Norms and Identity in Coordination Games," Discussion Papers 1505, University of Exeter, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:exe:wpaper:1505
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    File URL: http://people.exeter.ac.uk/RePEc/dpapers/DP1505.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Roby, 2021. "Can loss framing improve coordination in the minimum effort game?," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 16(3), pages 557-588, July.
    2. David Kelsey & Sara le Roux, 2018. "Strategic ambiguity and decision-making: an experimental study," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 84(3), pages 387-404, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    culture; identity; norms; coordination; bargaining;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C29 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Other
    • C71 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Cooperative Games
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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