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Can the Knowledge-Capital Model Explain Sectoral Foreign Invesment? Evidence From Singapore

  • Gnanaraj Chellaraj
  • Aaditya Mattoo

    (The World Bank)

Using the knowledge-capital model, we compare factors affecting the inbound and outbound manufacturing and services investment between Singapore and a sample of industrialized and developing countries. The nature of Singapore's two-way investment with the industrialized nations is essentially skill seeking, while with the developing countries it is low wage seeking with the exception of inbound services investment, which is skill seeking. During 1994-2003 time period, Singapore's skill abundance relative to all parent countries, increased annual average inbound investment in manufacturing and services by US$ 8.15 billion and US$ 15.19 billion respectively.

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Paper provided by East-West Center, Economics Study Area in its series Economics Study Area Working Papers with number 101.

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Length: pages 41
Date of creation: Mar 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ewc:wpaper:wp101
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  1. Gao, Ting, 2003. "Ethnic Chinese networks and international investment: evidence from inward FDI in China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 611-629, August.
  2. Markusen, James R., 1984. "Multinationals, multi-plant economies, and the gains from trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3-4), pages 205-226, May.
  3. Hiau Looi Kee & Hian Teck Hoon, 2004. "Trade, Capital Accumulation and Structural Unemployment: An Empirical Study of the Singapore Economy," Working Papers 06-2004, Singapore Management University, School of Economics, revised Mar 2004.
  4. Markusen, James R., 2002. "Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade," MPRA Paper 8380, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Bruce A. Blonigen & Ronald B. Davies & Keith Head, 2002. "Estimating the Knowledge-Capital Model of the Multinational Enterprise: Comment," NBER Working Papers 8929, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Hu, Albert Guangzhou, 2004. "Multinational Corporations, Patenting, and Knowledge Flow: The Case of Singapore," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(4), pages 781-800, July.
  7. Anwar, Sajid, 2008. "Foreign investment, human capital and manufacturing sector growth in Singapore," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 447-453.
  8. Stephen Ross Yeaple, 2003. "The Role of Skill Endowments in the Structure of U.S. Outward Foreign Direct Investment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 726-734, August.
  9. Andreas Waldkirch, 2010. "The structure of multinational activity: evidence from Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(24), pages 3119-3133.
  10. Theodore H. Moran & Edward M. Graham & Magnus Blomstrom, 2005. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 3810.
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