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Labor Skills and Foreign Investment in a Dynamic Economy: Estimating the Knowledge-Capital Model for Singapore

  • Gnanaraj Chellaraj

    ()

  • Keith Maskus

    ()

    (Universtiy of Colorado, Boulder)

  • Aaditya Mattoo

    ()

    (Development Economics Research Group, World Bank)

Singapore is an interesting example of how the pattern of foreign investment changes with economic development. In this paper, we analyze inbound and outbound investment between Singapore and a sample of industrialized and developing countries over the period 1984-2003. We find that SingaporeÂ’s two-way investment with industrialized nations has shifted into skill-seeking activities over the period, while SingaporeÂ’s investments in developing countries have increased sharply and become concentrated in labor-seeking activities. SingaporeÂ’s increasing skill abundance relative to all countries in our sample accounted for 41 per cent of average inbound stocks during the period, i.e. US$18 billion annually; the corresponding figure for outbound stocks was 40 per cent, i.e. US$5.51 billion annually.

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File URL: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/research/papers/doc/wp2009-21.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Adelaide, School of Economics in its series School of Economics Working Papers with number 2009-21.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:2009-21
Contact details of provider: Postal: Adelaide SA 5005
Phone: (618) 8303 5540
Web page: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/

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  1. Gao, Ting, 2003. "Ethnic Chinese networks and international investment: evidence from inward FDI in China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 611-629, August.
  2. Bruce A. Blonigen & Miao Wang, 2004. "Inappropriate Pooling of Wealthy and Poor Countries in Empirical FDI Studies," Working Papers and Research 0903, Marquette University, Center for Global and Economic Studies and Department of Economics.
  3. Hiau Looi Kee & Hian Teck Hoon, 2004. "Trade, capital accumulation, and structural unemployment : An empirical study of the Singapore economy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3272, The World Bank.
  4. Anwar, Sajid, 2008. "Foreign investment, human capital and manufacturing sector growth in Singapore," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 447-453.
  5. Jang-Sup Shin, 2005. "The Role Of The State In The Increasingly Globalized Economy: Implications For Singapore," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 50(01), pages 103-116.
  6. James R. Markusen, 2004. "Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262633078, June.
  7. Braconier, Henrik & Norbäck, Pehr-Johan & Urban, Dieter, 2003. "Reconciling the Evidence on the Knowledge Capital Model," Working Paper Series 590, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  8. Theodore H. Moran & Edward M. Graham & Magnus Blomstrom, 2005. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 3810, May.
  9. Bruce A. Blonigen, 2005. "A Review of the Empirical Literature on FDI Determinants," NBER Working Papers 11299, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Markusen, James R., 1984. "Multinationals, multi-plant economies, and the gains from trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3-4), pages 205-226, May.
  11. Bruce A. Blonigen & Ronald B. Davies & Keith Head, 2002. "Estimating the Knowledge-Capital Model of the Multinational Enterprise: Comment," NBER Working Papers 8929, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. David L. Carr & James R. Markusen & Keith E. Maskus, 2001. "Estimating the Knowledge-Capital Model of the Multinational Enterprise," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 693-708, June.
  13. Helpman, Elhanan, 1984. "A Simple Theory of International Trade with Multinational Corporations," Scholarly Articles 3445092, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  14. Linda Low & Eric D. Ramstetter & Henry Wai-Chung Yeung, 1996. "Accounting for Outward Direct Investment from Hong Kong and Singapore: Who Controls What?," NBER Working Papers 5858, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Andreas Waldkirch, 2010. "The structure of multinational activity: evidence from Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(24), pages 3119-3133.
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