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Role of Hub Firms in Geographical Transaction Network


  • SAITO Yukiko


In this study, we investigate the role of geographical proximity in an inter-firm transaction network and the role of hub firms on geographical spread of regional impact. By using inter-firm micro transaction data of over 800 thousands firms, we found that indirect transaction is geographically dispersed mainly due to a few hub firms, although firm's direct transactions mostly occur within geographically narrow areas. More precisely, median distance between indirect transaction partners (partners' partners) is 255km, which is much larger than that between direct transaction partners (29km). In a counterfactual transaction network without hub firms, whose transaction relations are no less than 100, median distance between indirect transaction partners is reduced to 70km, thereby suggesting the important role of hub firms in a geographical transaction network. We confirm this suggestion through an analysis of regional impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake.

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  • SAITO Yukiko, 2013. "Role of Hub Firms in Geographical Transaction Network," Discussion papers 13080, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:13080

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. NAKAJIMA Kentaro & SAITO Yukiko & UESUGI Iichiro, 2013. "Role of Inter-firm Transactions on Industrial Agglomeration: Evidence from Japanese firm-level data," Discussion papers 13021, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. NAKAJIMA Kentaro & SAITO Yukiko Umeno & UESUGI Iichiro, 2012. "Localization of Interfirm Transaction Relationships and Industry Agglomeration," Discussion papers 12023, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Yasusada Murata & Ryo Nakajima & Ryosuke Okamoto & Ryuichi Tamura, 2014. "Localized Knowledge Spillovers and Patent Citations: A Distance-Based Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(5), pages 967-985, December.
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    6. Xavier Gabaix, 2009. "Power Laws in Economics and Finance," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 255-294, May.
    7. Saito, Yukiko Umeno & Watanabe, Tsutomu & Iwamura, Mitsuru, 2007. "Do larger firms have more interfirm relationships?," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 383(1), pages 158-163.
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    9. Nakajima, Kentaro & Saito, Yukiko Umeno & Uesugi, Iichiro, 2012. "Measuring economic localization: Evidence from Japanese firm-level data," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 201-220.
    10. Fujita, Masahisa & Ogawa, Hideaki, 1982. "Multiple equilibria and structural transition of non-monocentric urban configurations," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 161-196, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vasco M. CARVALHO & NIREI Makoto & SAITO Yukiko, 2014. "Supply Chain Disruptions: Evidence from the Great East Japan Earthquake," Discussion papers 14035, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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