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Does New Economic Geography Faithfully Describe Reality?

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  • TABUCHI Takatoshi

Abstract

This paper shows that new economic geography models are capable of simulating the real-world tendency for urban agglomeration to the primate city. It is often observed that while regional populations were dispersed in early times, they have been increasingly concentrated into one capital region over recent years. The present paper thus demonstrates that multi-region, new economic geography models are able to simulate the real-world population distribution trends witnessed over the past few centuries.

Suggested Citation

  • TABUCHI Takatoshi, 2012. "Does New Economic Geography Faithfully Describe Reality?," Discussion papers 12071, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:12071
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    File URL: https://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/12e071.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Charlot, Sylvie & Gaigne, Carl & Robert-Nicoud, Frederic & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 2006. "Agglomeration and welfare: The core-periphery model in the light of Bentham, Kaldor, and Rawls," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1-2), pages 325-347, January.
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    18. repec:hhs:iuiwop:430 is not listed on IDEAS
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