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Can Declining Energy Intensity Mitigate Climate Change? Decomposition and Meta-Regression Results

  • Stephan B. Bruns
  • Christian Gross

Drawing on the Kaya identity, we assess the role of the main driver of the decline in carbon intensity, namely the (economic) energy intensity. Using meta-signi?ficance testing for a sample of 44 studies, dealing with the causality between energy and GDP, we ?find that both variables are strongly coupled. Hence, after having exhausted energy savings from nonrecurring structural changes, the economic energy intensity may soon converge than being arbitrarily reducible. We suggest, therefore, not to rely on further reductions of economic energy intensity but rather to invest in the reduction of the carbon intensity of energy to mitigate climate change.

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File URL: ftp://137.248.191.199/RePEc/esi/discussionpapers/2012-11.pdf
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Paper provided by Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography in its series Papers on Economics and Evolution with number 2012-11.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: 31 May 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:esi:evopap:2012-11
Contact details of provider: Postal: Deutschhausstrasse 10, 35032 Marburg
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  1. Druckman, Angela & Chitnis, Mona & Sorrell, Steve & Jackson, Tim, 2011. "Missing carbon reductions? Exploring rebound and backfire effects in UK households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3572-3581, June.
  2. Sorrell, Steve, 2009. "Jevons' Paradox revisited: The evidence for backfire from improved energy efficiency," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1456-1469, April.
  3. Christian Gross, 2011. "Explaining the (non-) causality between energy and economic growth in the U.S. - A multivariate sectoral analysis," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2011-04, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  4. Henriques, Sofia Teives & Kander, Astrid, 2010. "The modest environmental relief resulting from the transition to a service economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 271-282, December.
  5. Kander, Astrid, 2005. "Baumol's disease and dematerialization of the economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 119-130, October.
  6. Brannlund, Runar & Ghalwash, Tarek & Nordstrom, Jonas, 2007. "Increased energy efficiency and the rebound effect: Effects on consumption and emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-17, January.
  7. T. D. Stanley, 2005. "Beyond Publication Bias," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 309-345, 07.
  8. James E. Payne, 2010. "Survey of the international evidence on the causal relationship between energy consumption and growth," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(1), pages 53-95, January.
  9. Ozturk, Ilhan, 2010. "A literature survey on energy-growth nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 340-349, January.
  10. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
  11. Baksi, Soham & Green, Chris, 2007. "Calculating economy-wide energy intensity decline rate: The role of sectoral output and energy shares," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6457-6466, December.
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