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Framing Effects, Selective Information and Market Behavior ­ An Experimental Analysis ­

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  • Erich Kirchler
  • Boris Maciejovsky

    ()

  • Martin Weber

    ()

Abstract

The results of an asset market experiment, in which 64 subjects trade two assets on eight markets in a computerized continuous double auction, indicate that objectively irrelevant information influences trading behavior. Moreover, positively and negatively framed information leads to a particular trading pattern, but leaves trading prices and trading volume unaVected. In addition, we provide support for the disposition eVect. Participants who experience a gain sell their assets more rapidly than participants who experience a loss, and positively framed subjects generally sell their assets later than negatively framed subjects.

Suggested Citation

  • Erich Kirchler & Boris Maciejovsky & Martin Weber, 2004. "Framing Effects, Selective Information and Market Behavior ­ An Experimental Analysis ­," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2004-16, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:esi:discus:2004-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Choi, James J. & Laibson, David & Metrick, Andrew, 2002. "How does the Internet affect trading? Evidence from investor behavior in 401(k) plans," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 397-421, June.
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    4. Kuhberger, Anton, 1998. "The Influence of Framing on Risky Decisions: A Meta-analysis," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 23-55, July.
    5. Kuhberger, Anton, 1995. "The Framing of Decisions: A New Look at Old Problems," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 230-240, May.
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    9. Weber, Martin & Keppe, Hans-Jurgen & Meyer-Delius, Gabriela, 2000. "The impact of endowment framing on market prices -- an experimental analysis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 159-176, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. James Alm & Erich Kirchler & Stephan Muehlbacher & Katharina Gangl & Eva Hofmann & Christoph Kogler & Maria Pollai, 2012. "Rethinking the Research Paradigms for Analysing Tax Compliance Behaviour," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 13(2), pages 33-40, July.
    2. Kohsaka Youki & Grzegorz Mardyla & Shinji Takenaka & Yoshiro Tsutsui, 2013. "Disposition Effect and Loss Aversion: An Analysis Based on a Simulated Experimental Stock Market," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 13-02-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Apr 2013.
    3. Kohsaka Youki & Grzegorz Mardyla & Shinji Takenaka & Yoshiro Tsutsui, 2013. "Disposition Effect and Diminishing Sensitivity: An Analysis Based on a Simulated Experimental Stock Market," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 13-02-Rev.2, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Sep 2014.
    4. James Alm & Erich Kirchler & Stephan Muehlbacher, 2012. "Combining Psychology and Economics in the Analysis of Compliance: From Enforcement to Cooperation," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 133-152, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial markets; prospect theory; anchoring and adjustment; experimental economics; disposition eVect;

    JEL classification:

    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D44 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Auctions
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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