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I will survive! -- Gender discrimination in a household saving decisions experiment

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  • Susanne Büchner
  • Dennis A. V. Dittrich

Abstract

We investigate the gender specific intertemporal allocation behavior of spouses with different deterministic life expectations in an experiment where the gen- der of one's partner is known. In each period of their life both partners propose a consumption level one of which is then randomly implemented. To allow for learning one experiences many "lives". Participants achieve a rather high degree of optimality that does not change over time. Indepen- dent of the own gender a participant is nicer to women and acts more selfishly if the partner is a man. Participants are not aware of their discriminating behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Susanne Büchner & Dennis A. V. Dittrich, 2002. "I will survive! -- Gender discrimination in a household saving decisions experiment," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2002-14, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:esi:discus:2002-14
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Browning, 2000. "The Saving Behaviour of a Two‐person Household," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 102(2), pages 235-251, June.
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    3. James Andreoni & Lise Vesterlund, 2001. "Which is the Fair Sex? Gender Differences in Altruism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 293-312.
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    6. Meier, Katja & Kirchler, Erich & Hubert, Angela-Christian, 1999. "Savings and investment decisions within private households: Spouses' dominance in decisions on various forms of investment," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 499-519, October.
    7. Wirl, Franz & Feichtinger, Gustav, 2002. "Intrafamiliar Consumption and Saving under Altruism and Wealth Considerations," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(273), pages 93-111, February.
    8. Vital Anderhuba & Dennis A. V. Dittrich & Werner Güth & Nadege Marchandd, "undated". "Interpersonal allocation behavior in a household saving experiment," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2002-02, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
    9. Bolton, Gary E. & Katok, Elena, 1995. "An experimental test for gender differences in beneficent behavior," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 48(3-4), pages 287-292, June.
    10. Corfman, Kim P & Lehmann, Donald R, 1987. "Models of Cooperative Group Decision-Making and Relative Influence: An Experimental Investigation of Family Purchase Decisions," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 1-13, June.
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    12. Phipps, Shelley A & Burton, Peter S, 1998. "What's Mine Is Yours? The Influence of Male and Female Incomes on Patterns of Household Expenditure," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(260), pages 599-613, November.
    13. Dufwenberg, Martin & Muren, Astri, 2002. "Discrimination by Gender and Social Distance," Research Papers in Economics 2002:2, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
    14. Ortmann, Andreas & Tichy, Lisa K., 1999. "Gender differences in the laboratory: evidence from prisoner's dilemma games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 327-339, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Victoria Busch & Svenn-Åge Dahl & Dennis Dittrich, 2009. "An empirical study of age discrimination in Norway and Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 633-651.
    2. Tom Lane, 2015. "Discrimination in the laboratory: a meta-analysis," Discussion Papers 2015-03, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    intra-household behavior; experimental economics; considerate attitudes; gender discrimination;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making

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