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Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK's minority and majority ethnic groups


  • Nandi, Alita
  • Platt, Lucinda


Public and academic debate has revealed concern with the extent and implications of national identification among minority groups in Western societies. In this paper we present new analysis of Understanding Society that expands the limited evidence on minority identification. Drawing on Berry’s acculturation framework, we explore patterns of dual minority and majority identification among the UK’s minority ethnic groups. We find that minorities tend to hold strong British identities; but that that there are variations in identity acculturation across minority groups and by generation. We also show that there is substantial heterogeneity in the identities of the White majority population.

Suggested Citation

  • Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2014. "Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK's minority and majority ethnic groups," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2014-01

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ron Johnston & Ibrahim Sirkeci & Nabil Khattab & Tariq Modood, 2010. "Ethno-religious categories and measuring occupational attainment in relation to education in England and Wales: a multilevel analysis," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 42(3), pages 578-591, March.
    2. Berthoud, Richard & Fumagalli, Laura & Lynn, Peter & Platt, Lucinda, 2009. "Design of the Understanding Society ethnic minority boost sample," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2009-02, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Simonetta Longhi & Cheti Nicoletti & Lucinda Platt, 2013. "Explained and unexplained wage gaps across the main ethno-religious groups in Great Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 471-493, April.
    4. Lynn, Peter, 2009. "Sample design for Understanding Society," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2009-01, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Paolo Masella, 2013. "National identity and ethnic diversity," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 437-454, April.
    6. Ayse Guveli & Lucinda Platt, 2011. "Understanding the religious behaviour of Muslims in the Netherlands and the UK," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 858.11, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    7. Alan Manning & Sanchari Roy, 2010. "Culture Clash or Culture Club? National Identity in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(542), pages 72-100, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stuart Campbell, 2014. "Does it matter why immigrants came here? Original motives, the labour market, and national identity in the UK," DoQSS Working Papers 14-14, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    2. Simonetta Longhi, 2014. "Cultural diversity and subjective well-being," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-19, December.
    3. Frere-Smith, Tom & Luthra, Renee Reichl & Platt, Lucinda, 2014. "Sampling recently arrived immigrants in the UK: exploring the effectiveness of Respondent Driven Sampling," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-25, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Kézdi, Gábor & Mátyás, László & Balázsi, László & Divényi, János Károly, 2014. "A közgazdasági adatforradalom és a panelökonometria
      [The revolution in economic data and panel econometrics]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(11), pages 1319-1340.
    5. McGinnity, Frances & Gijsberts, Merove, 2015. "Perceived Group Discrimination among Polish Migrants to Western Europe: Comparing Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and Ireland," Papers WP502, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    6. Tom Frere-Smith & Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt, 2014. "Sampling Recently Arrived Immigrants in the UK: Exploring the effectiveness of Respondent Driven Sampling," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1432, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

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