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Sampling Recently Arrived Immigrants in the UK: Exploring the effectiveness of Respondent Driven Sampling

Author

Listed:
  • Tom Frere-Smith

    () (Ipsos MORI)

  • Renee Luthra

    () (University of Essex)

  • Lucinda Platt

    () (London School of Economics and Political Science)

Abstract

Surveying recently arrived immigrants in countries lacking a population register poses many challenges. We describe our adaptation of Respondent Driven Sampling, a chain-referral technique, to sample migrants from Pakistan and Poland who had arrived in the UK within the previous 18 months. Specifically, we discuss issues around connectedness, privacy, clustering, and motivation, central to the implementation of RDS. We outline techniques adopted and evaluate their success. We conclude that RDS is unlikely to be suitable for accessing newly arrived migrants. However, in the absence of registers which can capture populations at point of entry there are no obvious alternatives.

Suggested Citation

  • Tom Frere-Smith & Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt, 2014. "Sampling Recently Arrived Immigrants in the UK: Exploring the effectiveness of Respondent Driven Sampling," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1432, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1432
    as

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    File URL: https://www.cream-migration.org/publ_uploads/CDP_32_14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christian Dustmann & Tommaso Frattini & Caroline Halls, 2010. "Assessing the Fiscal Costs and Benefits of A8 Migration to the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 31(1), pages 1-41, March.
    2. David Card & Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2012. "Immigration, Wages, And Compositional Amenities," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 78-119, February.
    3. Berthoud, Richard & Fumagalli, Laura & Lynn, Peter & Platt, Lucinda, 2009. "Design of the Understanding Society ethnic minority boost sample," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2009-02, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2014. "Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK's minority and majority ethnic groups," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Martin Kahanec & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "How skilled immigration may improve economic equality," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-13, December.
    6. Massey, Douglas S. & Arango, Joaquin & Hugo, Graeme & Kouaouci, Ali & Pellegrino, Adela & Taylor, J. Edward, 1999. "Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294429.
    7. Stuart Campbell, 2013. "Over-education among A8 migrants in the UK," DoQSS Working Papers 13-09, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Florence Samkange-Zeeb & Ronja Foraita & Stefan Rach & Tilman Brand, 2019. "Feasibility of using respondent-driven sampling to recruit participants in superdiverse neighbourhoods for a general health survey," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 64(3), pages 451-459, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    new immigrants; surveys; RDS; immigrant networks; integration; non-response;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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