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Explained and unexplained wage gaps across the main ethno-religious groups in Great Britain

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  • Simonetta Longhi
  • Cheti Nicoletti
  • Lucinda Platt

Abstract

We analyse the difference in average wages (the so called 'wage gap') of selected ethno-religious groups in Great Britain at the mean and over the wage distribution with the aim of explaining why such wage gaps differ across minority groups. We distinguish minorities not only by their ethno-religious background, but also by country (UK or abroad) in which people grew up and acquired their qualifications. We find that within all minority ethno-religious groups the second generation achieves higher wages than the first generation, but the amount that is explained by characteristics does not necessarily increase with generation. Copyright 2013 Oxford University Press 2012 All rights reserved, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Simonetta Longhi & Cheti Nicoletti & Lucinda Platt, 2013. "Explained and unexplained wage gaps across the main ethno-religious groups in Great Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 471-493, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:65:y:2013:i:2:p:471-493
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gps025
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    Cited by:

    1. Knies, Gundi & Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2014. "Life satisfaction, ethnicity and neighbourhoods: is there an effect of neighbourhood ethnic composition on life satisfaction?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 55669, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Dsouza, Alwin & Singh, Sudershan & Ranjan, Rahul, 2015. "Existence of Structural Disadvantage among socio-religious groups: Is it a reality? An Analysis of Indian Labour Market," MPRA Paper 63648, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Ahmed, Salma, 2015. "Dynamics and diversity: How are religious minorities faring in the labour Market in Bangladesh?," MPRA Paper 75153, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Nov 2016.
    4. Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2014. "Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK's minority and majority ethnic groups," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Longhi, Simonetta, 2013. "Impact of cultural diversity on wages, evidence from panel data," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 797-807.
    6. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Necla Acik & Bradley Saunders, 2014. "Discriminatory labour market experiences of A8 national high skilled workers in the UK," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 2014(1402), pages 17-31, September.
    7. Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda, 2013. "Britishness and identity assimilation among the UK’s minority and majority ethnic groups," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2013-08, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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