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Measurement error and data collection methods: effects on estimates from event history data

  • Jäckle, Annette

Event history data from panel surveys typically display a concentration of transitions at the seam between waves of data collection. This ‘seam effect’ is likely to bias estimated durations of benefit receipt, attenuate the estimated effects of explanatory factors on conditional exit probabilities and bias estimated duration dependence. This paper uses benefit histories from survey reports and matched administrative records to assess the extent of bias in key estimates. The paper also evaluates the effectiveness at reducing bias of dependent interviewing techniques, where information collected in a previous interview is used to remind the respondent of sources reported previously, or to verify that sources no longer reported have truly ended.

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File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2008-13.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2008-13.

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Date of creation: 02 Apr 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2008-13
Contact details of provider: Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
Phone: 44-1206-872957
Fax: 44-1206-873151
Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
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Order Information: Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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  1. Hoynes, Hilary & MaCurdy, Thomas, 1994. "Has the Decline in Benefits Shortened Welfare Spells?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 43-48, May.
  2. Stephen P. Jenkins & Lorenzo Cappellari & Peter Lynn & Annette Jäckle & Emanuela Sala, 2006. "Patterns of consent: evidence from a general household survey," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 701-722.
  3. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-79, June.
  4. O'Neill, June A & Bassi, Laurie J & Wolf, Douglas A, 1987. "The Duration of Welfare Spells," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(2), pages 241-48, May.
  5. Blank, Rebecca M., 1989. "Analyzing the length of welfare spells," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 245-273, August.
  6. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-29 is not listed on IDEAS
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