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Financing Higher Education in Tunisia

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  • Tahar Abdessalem

    () (Ecole Polytechnique, Tunisia)

Abstract

This paper focuses on Tunisia, which like other developing countries, has allocated increasing levels of resources to education, particularly higher education, mainly through public funding over the past few decades. In 2005-2008, public expenditure on education amounted to around 7.4 percent of GDP, with 2 percent allocated to higher education. However, in the last few years, the budgetary constraints have increased, and are likely to remain so in the near future. These budgetary constraints exist within a context of rapidly increasing student enrollment, and the need to improve the quality of education to insure better employability of graduates. In light of this situation, public policy is obliged to define orientations and programs, improving quality and efficiency while reducing costs and resource wastage, to enhance access and equity. This paper is organized as follows: it begins with an assessment of public expenditure on higher education in Tunisia, with respect to its adequacy, efficiency and equity. Next, in section 2, we explore the challenges posed to financing by demographic evolution, the quality of education and private provision. Section 3 examines some financing reinforcement strategies, and analyzes feasible measures to raise private funding contributions. Section 4 provides some concluding remarks.

Suggested Citation

  • Tahar Abdessalem, 2010. "Financing Higher Education in Tunisia," Working Papers 551, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 Jan 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:551
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. World Bank, 2008. "The Road Not Traveled : Education Reform in the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6303.
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    7. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-834, August.
    8. Nadir Altinok, 2006. "Capital humain et croissance : l'apport des enquêtes internationales sur les acquis des élèves," Post-Print halshs-00180957, HAL.
    9. Zhang, Jie, 1996. " Optimal Public Investments in Education and Endogenous Growth," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(3), pages 387-404.
    10. Chen, Hung-ju, 2005. "Educational systems, growth and income distribution: a quantitative study," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 325-353, April.
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