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Analysis of Attrition Patterns in the Turkish Household Labor Force Survey, 2000-2002

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  • Insan Tunali

    () (Dept. of Economics, Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey)

Abstract

This paper offers an analysis of attrition patterns in the “new” Turkish Household Labor Force Survey (HLFS) which has been conducted since 2000. A key feature of the redesigned survey is the short panel component obtained from the rotating sampling frame. I exploit the information in 12 rounds of micro data collected (on a quarterly basis) over the period 2000– 2002 and focus on household level attrition within 3, 12 and 15 months of the initial interview. Attrition is a phenomenon which can be attributed to demographic and economic factors, including conditions in the labor market. If attrition is related to the labor force status of individuals, this could result in biases in labor market indicators. I provide strong evidence that household attrition is influenced by the labor force status (outside the labor force, employed, or unemployed) of the household head at the initial survey round and discuss the implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Insan Tunali, 2008. "Analysis of Attrition Patterns in the Turkish Household Labor Force Survey, 2000-2002," Working Papers 393, Economic Research Forum, revised 03 Jan 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:393
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hausman, Jerry A & Wise, David A, 1979. "Attrition Bias in Experimental and Panel Data: The Gary Income Maintenance Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 455-473, March.
    2. Jeffrey E. Zabel, 1998. "An Analysis of Attrition in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the Survey of Income and Program Participation with an Application to a Model of Labor Market Behavior," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 479-506.
    3. Gerard J. van den Berg & Maarten Lindeboom, 1998. "Attrition in Panel Survey Data and the Estimation of Multi-State Labor Market Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(2), pages 458-478.
    4. Arthur S. Goldberger, 1984. "Reverse Regression and Salary Discrimination," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(3), pages 293-318.
    5. Becketti, Sean, et al, 1988. "The Panel Study of Income Dynamics after Fourteen Years: An Evaluatio n," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(4), pages 472-492, October.
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