IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/jhriss/v19y1984i3p293-318.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Reverse Regression and Salary Discrimination

Author

Listed:
  • Arthur S. Goldberger

Abstract

Reverse regression has recently been proposed to assess discrimination by gender or race. We consider several stochastic models and find one that justifies reverse regression. Testable implications are deduced, and the analysis is illustrated with empirical material.

Suggested Citation

  • Arthur S. Goldberger, 1984. "Reverse Regression and Salary Discrimination," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(3), pages 293-318.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:19:y:1984:i:3:p:293-318
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/145875
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kenneth A. Couch & Thomas A. Dunn, 1997. "Intergenerational Correlations in Labor Market Status: A Comparison of the United States and Germany," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(1), pages 210-232.
    2. Nancy A. Jianakoplos & Paul L. Menchik, 1997. "Wealth Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 18-31, February.
    3. Gottschalk, Peter, 1996. "Is the correlation in welfare participation across generations spurious?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 1-25.
    4. Mary Corcoran & Roger Gordon & Deborah Laren & Gary Solon, 1992. "The Association between Men's Economic Status and Their Family and Community Origins," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(4), pages 575-601.
    5. Menchik, Paul L, 1979. "Inter-generational Transmission of Inequality: An Empirical Study of Wealth Mobility," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 46(184), pages 349-362, November.
    6. Solon, Gary, 1992. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 393-408.
    7. Gottschalk, Peter, 1996. "Is the correlation in welfare participation across generations spurious?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 1-25.
    8. Colin Cameron, A. & Windmeijer, Frank A. G., 1997. "An R-squared measure of goodness of fit for some common nonlinear regression models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 329-342, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Insan Tunali, 2008. "Analysis of Attrition Patterns in the Turkish Household Labor Force Survey, 2000-2002," Working Papers 393, Economic Research Forum, revised 03 Jan 2008.
    2. Kapsalis, Constantine, 2010. "Wage discrimination: The case for reverse regression," MPRA Paper 27331, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Michael LaCour-Little, 1996. "Application of Reverse Regression to Boston Federal Reserve Data Refutes Claims of Discrimination," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 11(1), pages 1-12.
    4. Jens Ludwig & Sendhil Mullainathan & Jann Spiess, 2017. "Machine Learning Tests for Effects on Multiple Outcomes," Papers 1707.01473, arXiv.org.
    5. Lawrence M. Kahn, 2009. "The Economics of Discrimination: Evidence from Basketball," NCER Working Paper Series 40, National Centre for Econometric Research.
    6. Xi Chen, 2011. "Increasing Returns to Scale in U.S. manufacturing industries: evidence from direct and reverse regression," Working Papers of BETA 2011-11, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    7. Stephen L. Ross, 2003. "What Is Known about Testing for Discrimination: Lessons Learned by Comparing across Different Markets," Working papers 2003-21, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2003.
    8. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:693-785 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Bodvarsson, Orn B. & Partridge, Mark D., 2001. "A supply and demand model of co-worker, employer and customer discrimination," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 389-416, June.
    10. Lawrence M. Kahn, 2000. "The Sports Business as a Labor Market Laboratory," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 75-94, Summer.
    11. Edna Schechtman & Shlomo Yitzhaki & Taina Pudalov, 2011. "Gini’s multiple regressions: two approaches and their interaction," Metron - International Journal of Statistics, Dipartimento di Statistica, Probabilità e Statistiche Applicate - University of Rome, vol. 0(1), pages 67-99.
    12. Jed L. DeVaro & Jeffrey M. Lacker, 1995. "Errors in variables and lending discrimination," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 19-32.
    13. Pearl Judea, 2013. "Linear Models: A Useful “Microscope” for Causal Analysis," Journal of Causal Inference, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 155-170, June.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:19:y:1984:i:3:p:293-318. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://jhr.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.