IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/erg/wpaper/1089.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Access to Healthcare, Utilization and Health Outcomes in Turkey

Author

Listed:
  • Burhan Can Karahasan
  • Firat Bilgel

    () (Okan University, Turkey)

Abstract

This paper examines the link between healthcare access/utilization and health outcomes in Turkey within a spatial framework. Our initial set of findings highlight an overall duality in health indicators which is getting stronger once spatial dimension is included. Specifically we find wider spatial dichotomy for health outcomes relative to access and utilization measures. Finally once we consider unobserved heterogeneity, spatial spillovers and spatial variability; our results pin point a non-robust link between healthcare access/utilization measures and health outcomes which works better among the already developed regions of Turkey. Overall our combined results indicate an ongoing polarization of health-based human capital development which coincides with local variations of the relationship between healthcare access/utilization and outcomes in Turkey.

Suggested Citation

  • Burhan Can Karahasan & Firat Bilgel, 2017. "Access to Healthcare, Utilization and Health Outcomes in Turkey," Working Papers 1089, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:1089
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://erf.org.eg/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/1089.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://bit.ly/2ovIg4J
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zhang, Xiaobo & Kanbur, Ravi, 2005. "Spatial inequality in education and health care in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 189-204.
    2. Fang, Pengqian & Dong, Siping & Xiao, Jingjing & Liu, Chaojie & Feng, Xianwei & Wang, Yiping, 2010. "Regional inequality in health and its determinants: Evidence from China," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 14-25, January.
    3. Ferhan Gezici & Geoffrey J. D. Hewings, 2007. "Spatial Analysis of Regional Inequalities in Turkey," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 383-403, April.
    4. Head, Keith & Mayer, Thierry, 2006. "Regional wage and employment responses to market potential in the EU," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 573-594, September.
    5. Kamar Ali & Mark D. Partridge & M. Rose Olfert, 2007. "Can Geographically Weighted Regressions Improve Regional Analysis and Policy Making?," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 30(3), pages 300-329, July.
    6. Bourguignon, Francois, 1979. "Decomposable Income Inequality Measures," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(4), pages 901-920, July.
    7. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543.
    8. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Health and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(2), pages 329-366, November.
    9. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Thierry Mayer & Jacques-François Thisse, 2008. "Economic Geography: The Integration of Regions and Nations," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00311000, HAL.
    10. Amar A. Hamoudi & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1999. "Economic Consequences of Health Status: A Review of the Evidence," CID Working Papers 30, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    11. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt & Fabrice Murtin, 2011. "The Relationship Between Health and Growth: When Lucas Meets Nelson-Phelps," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 2(1).
    12. Redding, Stephen & Schott, Peter K., 2003. "Distance, skill deepening and development: will peripheral countries ever get rich?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 515-541, December.
    13. Anselin, Luc & Getis, Arthur, 1992. "Spatial Statistical Analysis and Geographic Information Systems," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 26(1), pages 19-33, April.
    14. Redding, Stephen & Venables, Anthony J., 2004. "Economic geography and international inequality," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 53-82, January.
    15. Amar A Hamoudi & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1999. "Economic Consequences of Health Status: A Review of the Evidence," CID Working Papers 30A, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    16. Ehrlich, Isaac & Lui, Francis T, 1991. "Intergenerational Trade, Longevity, and Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(5), pages 1029-1059, October.
    17. Richard H. Steckel & Roderick Floud, 1997. "Introduction to "Health and Welfare during Industrialization"," NBER Chapters,in: Health and Welfare during Industrialization, pages 1-16 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Vassilis Monastiriotis, 2009. "Examining the consistency of spatial association patterns across socio-economic indicators: an application to the Greek regions," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 25-49, September.
    19. Braveman, Paula & Tarimo, Eleuther, 2002. "Social inequalities in health within countries: not only an issue for affluent nations," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 54(11), pages 1621-1635, June.
    20. Guillem Lopez-Casasnovas & Joan Costa-Font & Ivan Planas, 2005. "Diversity and regional inequalities in the Spanish 'system of health care services'," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(S1), pages 221-235.
    21. Richard H. Steckel & Roderick Floud, 1997. "Health and Welfare during Industrialization," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number stec97-1, December.
    22. Bloom, David E. & Canning, David & Sevilla, Jaypee, 2004. "The Effect of Health on Economic Growth: A Production Function Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-13, January.
    23. Frohlich, Katherine L. & Ross, Nancy & Richmond, Chantelle, 2006. "Health disparities in Canada today: Some evidence and a theoretical framework," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 79(2-3), pages 132-143, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:1089. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sherine Ghoneim). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/erfaceg.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.