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Economic Consequences of Health Status: A Review of the Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Amar A. Hamoudi
  • Jeffrey D. Sachs

Abstract

The correlation between health and economic performance is extremely robust across communities and over time. Many factors exogenous to income play an important role in determining health status, including a number of geographical, environmental, and evolutionary factors. This suggests the existence of simultaneous impacts of health on wealth and wealth on health. Potential health impacts on national economic performance are explored, and some important unanswered questions are identified.

Suggested Citation

  • Amar A. Hamoudi & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1999. "Economic Consequences of Health Status: A Review of the Evidence," CID Working Papers 30, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:cidhav:30
    as

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    File URL: http://www.cid.harvard.edu/cidwp/pdf/030.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dora Costa & Richard H. Steckel, 1997. "Long-Term Trends in Health, Welfare, and Economic Growth in the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Health and Welfare during Industrialization, pages 47-90 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Schultz, T. Paul, 1997. "Assessing the productive benefits of nutrition and health: An integrated human capital approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 141-158, March.
    3. John Luke Gallup & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew D. Mellinger, 1998. "Geography and Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 6849, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. John Luke Gallup & Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew D. Mellinger, 1998. "Geography and Economic Development," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1856, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    5. Selma J. Mushkin, 1962. "Health as an Investment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 129-129.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bratti, Massimiliano & Mendola, Mariapia, 2014. "Parental health and child schooling," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 94-108.
    2. Céline Azémar & Rodolphe Desbordes, 2009. "Public Governance, Health and Foreign Direct Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(4), pages 667-709, August.
    3. Raouf Boucekkine & Rodolphe Desbordes & Hélène Latzer, 2009. "How do epidemics induce behavioral changes?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 233-264, September.
    4. Martine AUDIBERT & Pascale COMBES MOTEL & Alassane DRABO, 2010. "Global Burden of Disease and Economic Growth," Working Papers 201036, CERDI.
    5. repec:ilo:ilowps:375955 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Haruna Modibbo Usman & Mustapha Muktar & Nasiru Inuwa, 2015. "Health Outcomes and Economic Growth Nexus: Testing for Long Run Relationship and Causal Links in Nigeria," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 3(4), pages 176-183, April.
    7. J.A.S. Obansa & Mohammed Yelwa & K.O. Diyoke, 2014. "The Impact of HIV/AIDS on Relative Income Differential and Economic Growth in Nigeria: 1986-2010," Journal of Empirical Economics, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 2(1), pages 7-18.
    8. Indunil De Silva & Sudarno Sumarto, 2015. "Dynamics Of Growth, Poverty And Human Capital: Evidence From Indonesian Sub-National Data," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 40(2), pages 1-33, June.
    9. Kassouf, Ana Lúcia. & Dorman, Peter., 2003. "Costs and benefits of eliminating child labour in Brazil," ILO Working Papers 993740973402676, International Labour Organization.
    10. Prince Boakye Frimpong & George Adu, 2014. "Population Health and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Panel Cointegration Analysis," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 36-48, April.
    11. Bloom, David E. & Canning, David & Sevilla, Jaypee, 2004. "The Effect of Health on Economic Growth: A Production Function Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-13, January.
    12. Mine Yilmazer & Serkan Çinar, 2015. "Human Capabilities and Economic Growth: A Comparative Human Capability Index," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(4), pages 843-853.
    13. Husain, Muhammad Jami, 2010. "Contribution of health to economic development: A survey and overview," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 4, pages 1-52.
    14. Rutten, Martine & Reed, Geoffrey, 2009. "A comparative analysis of some policy options to reduce rationing in the UK's NHS: Lessons from a general equilibrium model incorporating positive health effects," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 221-233, January.
    15. repec:ilo:ilowps:374097 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Husain, Muhammad Jami, 2009. "Contribution of health to economic development: a survey and overview," Economics Discussion Papers 2009-40, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    17. Chen, Guo, 2013. "Health costs, factor productivity and foreign direct investment flows," Master's Theses 157717, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    18. Dino Falaschetti, 2005. "Aggregate Health Expenditures, National Income, And Institutions For Private Property," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 393-431, November.
    19. Sumarto, Sudarno & De Silva, Indunil, 2014. "Being Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: Dynamics of Indonesian Subnational Growth and Poverty," MPRA Paper 57824, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Burhan Can Karahasan & Firat Bilgel, 2017. "Access to Healthcare, Utilization and Health Outcomes in Turkey," Working Papers 1089, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 2017.
    21. repec:pra:mprapa:10841 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    health; economic growth; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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