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Stuck in the jam? CO2 emissions and energy intensity in Mexico


  • Francisco Aguayo

    () (El Colegio de México)


Global emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) have been accelerating in recent decades. Moreover, since the year 2000 global emissions have been growing far more rapidly than the worst scenarios projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (Rogner et al., 2007, Raupach, et al., 2007). This growth has been driven by the expansion of activity in the world economy and the reversal of earlier declining trends in both the energy intensity of gross domestic product and the carbon intensity of energy (measured respectively, as energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product and the CO2 emissions per unit of total primary energy supply). According to the last report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), during the period 1970 to 2004 global emissions have risen as the combined effect of global income growth (77%) and global population growth (69%), which have surpassed the general decrease in energy intensity of GDP (-33%) and the almost null reduction in carbon intensity of energy (-2%). In other words, “declining carbon and energy intensities have been unable to offset income effects and population growth” at a global scale, rising consequently carbon emissions (Rogner et al., 2007, p. 107).

Suggested Citation

  • Francisco Aguayo, 2010. "Stuck in the jam? CO2 emissions and energy intensity in Mexico," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2010-01, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
  • Handle: RePEc:emx:ceedoc:2010-01

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. de Bruyn, S. M. & van den Bergh, J. C. J. M. & Opschoor, J. B., 1998. "Economic growth and emissions: reconsidering the empirical basis of environmental Kuznets curves," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 161-175, May.
    2. Dean Baker, 2003. "The Environmental Kuznets Curve: Comments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 226-227, Winter.
    3. Panayotou, Theodore, 1997. "Demystifying the environmental Kuznets curve: turning a black box into a policy tool," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(04), pages 465-484, November.
    4. Aguayo, Francisco & Gallagher, Kevin P., 2005. "Economic reform, energy, and development: the case of Mexican manufacturing," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 829-837, May.
    5. Roca, Jordi & Alcantara, Vicent, 2001. "Energy intensity, CO2 emissions and the environmental Kuznets curve. The Spanish case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(7), pages 553-556, June.
    6. Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada & Bengochea-Morancho, Aurelia, 2004. "Pooled mean group estimation of an environmental Kuznets curve for CO2," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 121-126, January.
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    CO2 emissions; energy intensity; environmental Kuznets curves;

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • N76 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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