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Institutional Change and Firm Adaptation

Author

Listed:
  • Carney, M.
  • Gedajlovic, E.R.

Abstract

We develop a typology of organizational forms found in Southeast Asia that contains four major archetypes, Colonial Business Groups, Family Business Groups, Government Linked Enterprises, and New Managers. We explain how the institutional environment prevailing at their founding profoundly influence the strategies and capabilities of each form. Consequently, strategic repertoires and competencies that are imperfectly aligned with environmental conditions largely delimit the capacity for organizational adaptation in the face of environmental change. We discuss the consequences of such a pattern of path dependence for each organizational form as well as the social and economic systems in which they are embedded.

Suggested Citation

  • Carney, M. & Gedajlovic, E.R., 2001. "Institutional Change and Firm Adaptation," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2001-08-STR, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:eureri:75
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    File URL: https://repub.eur.nl/pub/75/erimrs20010214170413.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Edgar C. Schein, 1996. "Strategic Pragmatism: The Culture of Singapore's Economics Development Board," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262193671, October.
    2. Chan, Wellington K. K., 1982. "The Organizational Structure of the Traditional Chinese Firm and its Modern Reform," Business History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(02), pages 218-235, June.
    3. S. D. Chapman, 1985. "British-Based Investment Groups Before 1914," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 38(2), pages 230-247, May.
    4. John H Dunning, 1995. "Reappraising the Eclectic Paradigm in an Age of Alliance Capitalism," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 26(3), pages 461-491, September.
    5. Ghemawat, Pankaj & Khanna, Tarun, 1998. "The Nature of Diversified Business Groups: A Research Design and Two Case Studies," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 35-61, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Southeast Asia; colonial business groups; family business groups; institutional change; organizational adaptation;

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure
    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics

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