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Corporate Social Responsibility in Large Family and Founder Firms

Author

Listed:
  • Block, J.H.
  • Wagner, M.

Abstract

Based on arguments about long-term orientation and corporate reputation, we argue that family and founder firms differ from other firms with regard to corporate social responsibility. Using Bayesian analysis, we then show that family and founder ownership are associated with a lower level of corporate social responsibility concerns, whereas ownership by institutional investors is associated with a higher level of corporate social responsibility concerns and a lower level of corporate social responsibility initiatives. We conclude that it makes sense to distinguish between family, founder and institutional investors and their roles as owners or managers when analyzing the effects of corporate governance on corporate social responsibility.

Suggested Citation

  • Block, J.H. & Wagner, M., 2010. "Corporate Social Responsibility in Large Family and Founder Firms," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2010-027-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:eureri:20273
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    File URL: https://repub.eur.nl/pub/20273/ERS-2010-027-ORG.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anderson, Ronald C. & Lee, D. Scott, 1997. "Ownership Studies: The Data Source Does Matter," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(3), pages 311-329, September.
    2. Dlugosz, Jennifer & Fahlenbrach, Rudiger & Gompers, Paul & Metrick, Andrew, 2006. "Large blocks of stock: Prevalence, size, and measurement," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 594-618, June.
    3. Morten Bennedsen & Kasper Meisner Nielsen & Francisco Perez-Gonzalez & Daniel Wolfenzon, 2007. "Inside the Family Firm: The Role of Families in Succession Decisions and Performance," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 647-691.
    4. Stijn Claessens & Simeon Djankov & Joseph P. H. Fan & Larry H. P. Lang, 2002. "Disentangling the Incentive and Entrenchment Effects of Large Shareholdings," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(6), pages 2741-2771, December.
    5. Jörn Hendrich Block, 2008. "Family Management, Family Ownership and Downsizing: Evidence from S&P 500 Firms," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2008-023, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    6. Campbell, Tim S & Marino, Anthony M, 1994. "Myopic Investment Decisions and Competitive Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 35(4), pages 855-875, November.
    7. Fama, Eugene F, 1980. "Agency Problems and the Theory of the Firm," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(2), pages 288-307, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    corporate social responsibility; family firms; family management; family ownership; founder firms; long-term orientation;

    JEL classification:

    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior
    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics
    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility

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