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Linguistic Polarization and Conflict in the Basque Country


  • Gardeazabal, Javier


This paper investigates the relationship between linguistic polarization and conflict in the Basque Country. During the 40 years of Franco’s dictatorship the use of the Basque language was banned. Therefore, there may be some linguistic roots underlying the conflict in the Basque Country. We show that at the municipality level, linguistic polarization reduces the level of conflict. This finding is robust to various ways of measuring linguistic and ideological polarization and the inclusion of other covariates. In addition, we find that a high level of the stock of human capital is beneficial for reducing conflict intensity.

Suggested Citation

  • Gardeazabal, Javier, 2011. "Linguistic Polarization and Conflict in the Basque Country," DFAEII Working Papers 2011-02, University of the Basque Country - Department of Foundations of Economic Analysis II.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehu:dfaeii:6405

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Todd Sandler, 2011. "The many faces of counterterrorism: an introduction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 225-234, December.
    2. Maria Paz Espinosa & Enrique Fatas & Paloma Ubeda, 2015. "Identity, language, and conflict: An experiment on ethno-linguistic diversity and group discrimination in two bilingual societies," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 15-14, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    3. Brahmachari, Deborshi, 2016. "Economic Determinants of Conflict - A proposal for North Eastern States of India," MPRA Paper 75400, University Library of Munich, Germany.


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