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Rules and reality: quantifying the practice of apprenticeship in early modern Europe

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  • Minns, Chris
  • Wallis, Patrick

Abstract

This paper uses recently digitised samples of apprentices and masters in London and Bristol to quantify the practice of apprenticeship in the late 17th century. Apprenticeship appears much more fluid than is traditionally understood. Many apprentices did not complete their terms of indenture; late arrival and early departure from the master’s household was widespread. Other apprentices appear to have been absent temporarily, returning to the master shortly before the end of their indenture. Regression analysis indicates that the patterns of presence and absence are broadly reflective of the resources and outside opportunities available to apprentices.

Suggested Citation

  • Minns, Chris & Wallis, Patrick, 2009. "Rules and reality: quantifying the practice of apprenticeship in early modern Europe," Economic History Working Papers 27865, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:wpaper:27865
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/27865/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marc Klemp & Chris Minns & Patrick Wallis & Jacob Weisdorf, 2012. "Family Investment Strategies in Pre-modern Societies: Human Capital, Migration, and Birth Order in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century England," Working Papers 0018, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Leunig, Tim & Minns, Chris & Wallis, Patrick, 2009. "Networks in the premodern economy: the market for London apprenticeships, 1600-1749," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28686, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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