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On the Notion of Regional Economic Resilience: Conceptualisation and Explanation

  • Ron Martin

    ()

  • Peter Sunley
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    Over the past few years a new buzzword has entered academic, political and public discourse: the notion of resilience, a term invoked to describe how an entity or system responds to shocks and disturbances. Although the concept has been used for some time in ecology and psychology, it is now invoked in diverse contexts, both as a perceived (and typically positive) attribute of an object, entity or system and, more normatively, as a desired feature that should somehow be promoted or fostered. As part of this development, the notion of resilience is rapidly becoming part of the conceptual and analytical lexicon of regional and local economic studies: there is increasing interest in the resilience of regional, local and urban economies. Further, resilience is rapidly emerging as an idea ‘whose time has come’ in policy debates: a new imperative of ‘constructing’ or ‘building’ regional and urban economic resilience is gaining currency. However, this rush to use the idea of regional and local economic resilience in policy circles has arguably run somewhat ahead of our understanding of the concept. There is still considerable ambiguity about what, precisely, is meant by the notion of regional economic resilience, about how it should be conceptualized and measured, what its determinants are, and how it links to patterns of long-run regional growth. The aim of this paper is to address these and related questions on the meaning and explanation of regional economic resilience and thereby to outline the directions of a research agenda.

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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1320.pdf
    File Function: Version October 2013
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    Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 1320.

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    Length: 46 pages
    Date of creation: Oct 2013
    Date of revision: Oct 2013
    Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1320
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    Web page: http://econ.geo.uu.nl

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    1. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2007. "Complexity Thinking and Evolutionary Economic Geography," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0703, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Apr 2007.
    2. Michael Storper & Allen J. Scott, 2009. "Rethinking human capital, creativity and urban growth," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 147-167, March.
    3. Perrings, Charles, 2006. "Resilience and sustainable development," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(04), pages 417-427, August.
    4. Paul Ormerod, 2010. "Resilience after localeconomic shocks," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(5), pages 503-507.
    5. Sweta Chaman Saxena & Valerie Cerra, 2005. "Growth Dynamics; The Myth of Economic Recovery," IMF Working Papers 05/147, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Briguglio, Lino & Cordina, Gordon & Farrugia, Nadia & Vella, Stephanie, 2008. "Economic Vulnerability and Resilience: Concepts and Measurements," Working Paper Series RP2008/55, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2011. "Conceptualising Cluster Evolution: Beyond the Life-Cycle Model?," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1112, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jul 2011.
    8. Ron Martin, 2012. "Regional economic resilience, hysteresis and recessionary shocks," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 1-32, January.
    9. Marshall, Alfred, 1890. "The Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number marshall1890.
    10. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2006. "Path dependence and regional economic evolution," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 395-437, August.
    11. Ron A. Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2005. "Why is economic geography not an evolutionary science? Towards an evolutionary economic geography," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0501, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Feb 2005.
    12. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2011. "Conceptualizing Cluster Evolution: Beyond the Life Cycle Model?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(10), pages 1299-1318, November.
    13. Hanley, Nick, 1998. "Resilience in social and economic systems: a concept that fails the cost benefit test?," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(02), pages 221-262, May.
    14. Peterson, Garry, 2000. "Political ecology and ecological resilience:: An integration of human and ecological dynamics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 323-336, December.
    15. Sergio J. Rey & Mark V. Janikas, 2005. "Regional convergence, inequality, and space," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(2), pages 155-176, April.
    16. J. Stan Metcalfe & John Foster & Ronnie Ramlogan, 2006. "Adaptive economic growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(1), pages 7-32, January.
    17. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "Regional Evolutions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 1-76.
    18. Cross, Rod, 1993. "On the Foundations of Hysteresis in Economic Systems," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(01), pages 53-74, April.
    19. Edward L. Glaeser, 2005. "Reinventing Boston: 1630--2003," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(2), pages 119-153, April.
    20. Ron Martin, 2010. "Roepke Lecture in Economic Geography-Rethinking Regional Path Dependence: Beyond Lock-in to Evolution," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 86(1), pages 1-27, 01.
    21. Audretsch, David B & Falck, Oliver & Feldman, Maryann P & Heblich, Stephan, 2008. "The Lifecycle of Regions," CEPR Discussion Papers 6757, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    22. Giuseppe Arbia & Jean H. P. Paelinck, 2003. "Economic convergence or divergence? Modeling the interregional dynamics of EU regions, 1985–1999," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 291-314, November.
    23. Ron Boschma & Ron Martin (ed.), 2010. "The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography," Books, Edward Elgar, number 12864, March.
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