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The Long Persistence of Regional Entrepreneurship Culture: Germany 1925–2005

  • Michael Fritsch

    ()

  • Michael Wyrwich

    ()

We investigate the persistence of levels of self-employment and new business formation in different time periods and under different framework conditions. The analysis shows that high levels of regional self-employment and new business formation tend to be persistent for periods as long as 80 years and that such an entrepreneurial culture can even survive abrupt and drastic changes in the politic-economic environment. We thus conclude that regional entrepreneurship cultures do exist and that they have long-lasting effects.

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File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1214.pdf
File Function: Version July 2012
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Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 1214.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2012
Date of revision: Jul 2012
Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1214
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  1. Andersson, Martin & Koster, Sierdjan, 2009. "Sources of Persistence in Regional Start-Up Rates - evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 177, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  2. David Audretsch & Max Keilbach, 2004. "Entrepreneurship Capital and Economic Performance," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(8), pages 949-959.
  3. Michael Wyrwich, 2010. "Regional Entrepreneurial Heritage in a Socialist and a Post-Socialist Economy," DRUID Working Papers 10-20, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  4. Michael Fritsch & Pamela Mueller, 2005. "The Persistence of Regional New Business Formation-Activity over Time – Assessing the Potential of Policy Promotion Programs," ERSA conference papers ersa05p706, European Regional Science Association.
  5. Sascha O. Becker & Katrin Boeckh & Christa Hainz & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "The Empire is Dead, Long Live the Empire! Long-Run Persistence of Trust and Corruption in the Bureaucracy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3392, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Nico Voigtländer & Joachim Voth, 2011. "Persecution perpetuated: The medieval origins of anti-semitic violence in Nazi Germany," Economics Working Papers 1269, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  7. Sjoerd Beugelsdijk & Niels Noorderhaven, 2004. "Entrepreneurial attitude and economic growth: A cross-section of 54 regions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 199-218, 06.
  8. Dunn, Thomas & Holtz-Eakin, Douglas, 2000. "Financial Capital, Human Capital, and the Transition to Self-Employment: Evidence from Intergenerational Links," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 282-305, April.
  9. Michael Fritsch & Alexander S. Kritikos & Alina Rusakova, 2012. "Who Starts a Business and Who Is Self-Employed in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1184, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  10. Michael Anyadike-Danes & Mark Hart & Helena Lenihan, 2011. "New business formation in a rapidly growing economy: the Irish experience," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(4), pages 503-516, May.
  11. Michael Fritsch & Oliver Falck, 2007. "New Business Formation by Industry over Space and Time: A Multidimensional Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(2), pages 157-172.
  12. Zoltan Acs & Pamela Mueller, 2008. "Employment effects of business dynamics: Mice, Gazelles and Elephants," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 85-100, January.
  13. Michael Fritsch, 2004. "Entrepreneurship, entry and performance of new business compared in two growth regimes: East and West Germany," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 14(5), pages 525-542, December.
  14. Hall, John & Ludwig, Udo, 1995. "German Unification and the 'Market Adoption' Hypothesis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 491-507, August.
  15. Sjoerd Beugelsdijk, 2007. "Entrepreneurial culture, regional innovativeness and economic growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 187-210, April.
  16. Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde, 2012. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Risk and Trust Attitudes," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 645-677.
  17. Thomas Dunn & Douglas Holtz-Eakin, 1996. "Financial Capital, Human Capital, and the Transition to Self-Employment:Evidence from Intergenerational Links," NBER Working Papers 5622, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Esteban Lafuente & Yancy Vaillant & Josep Rialp, 2007. "Regional Differences in the Influence of Role Models: Comparing the Entrepreneurial Process of Rural Catalonia," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 779-796.
  19. Simone Chlosta & Holger Patzelt & Sabine Klein & Christian Dormann, 2012. "Parental role models and the decision to become self-employed: The moderating effect of personality," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 121-138, January.
  20. Minniti, Maria, 2005. "Entrepreneurship and network externalities," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 1-27, May.
  21. North, Douglass C, 1994. "Economic Performance through Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 359-68, June.
  22. Pamela Mueller & André van Stel & David J. Storey, 2006. "The effects of new firm formation on regional development over time: The case of Great Britain," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2006-24, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
  23. Audretsch, David B. & Fritsch, Michael, 1993. "A Note on the Measurement of Entry Rates," Freiberg Working Papers 1993,05, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  24. Michael C. Burda & Jennifer Hunt, 2001. "From Reunification to Economic Integration: Productivity and the Labor Market in Eastern Germany," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(2), pages 1-92.
  25. Alberto Alesina & Nicola Fuchs-Schundeln, 2005. "Good bye Lenin (or not?): The effect of Communism on people's preferences," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2076, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  26. Laspita, Stavroula & Breugst, Nicola & Heblich, Stephan & Patzelt, Holger, 2012. "Intergenerational transmission of entrepreneurial intentions," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 414-435.
  27. Davidsson, Per & Wiklund, Johan, 1997. "Values, beliefs and regional variations in new firm formation rates," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 18(2-3), pages 179-199, April.
  28. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  29. Jennifer Hunt, 2006. "Staunching Emigration from East Germany: Age and the Determinants of Migration," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(5), pages 1014-1037, 09.
  30. Yuko Aoyama, 2009. "Entrepreneurship and Regional Culture: The Case of Hamamatsu and Kyoto, Japan," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 495-512.
  31. Pamela Mueller & André Stel & David Storey, 2008. "The effects of new firm formation on regional development over time: The case of Great Britain," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 59-71, January.
  32. Michael Fritsch & Pamela Mueller, 2004. "The Effects of New Business Formation on Regional Development over Time," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2004-36, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
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