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Social Learning with Payoff Complementarities

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  • Amil Dasgupta

    (Yale University)

Abstract

We incorporate strategic complementarities into a multi-agent sequential choice model with observable actions and private information. In this framework agents are concerned with learning from predecessors, signalling to successors, and coordinating their actions with those of others. Coordination problems have hitherto been studied using static coordination games which do not allow for learning behavior. Social learning has been examined using games of sequential action under uncertainty, but in the absence of strategic complementarities (herding models). Our model captures the strategic behavior of static coordination games, the social learning aspect of herding models, and the signalling behavior missing from both of these classes of models in one unified framework. In sequential action problems with incomplete information, agents exhibit herd behavior if later decision makers assign too little importance to their private information, choosing instead to imitate their predecessors. In our setting we demonstrate that agents may exhibit either strong herd behavior (complete imitation) or weak herd behavior (overoptimism) and characterize the informational requirements for these distinct outcomes. We also characterize the informational requirements to ensure the possibility of coordination upon a risky but socially optimal action in a game with finite but unboundedly large numbers of players.

Suggested Citation

  • Amil Dasgupta, 2000. "Social Learning with Payoff Complementarities," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0322, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:wc2000:0322
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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2000. "Global Games: Theory and Applications," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1275, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    2. repec:eee:gamebe:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:392-410 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hüning, Hendrik & Meub, Lukas, 2016. "Optimal public information dissemination: Introducing multiplier effects into a generalized beauty contest," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 260 [rev.], University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Koessler, Frédéric & Noussair, Charles & Ziegelmeyer, Anthony, 2008. "Parimutuel betting under asymmetric information," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(7-8), pages 733-744, July.
    5. VERGARI, Cecilia, 2004. "Herd behaviour, strategic complementarities and technology adoption," CORE Discussion Papers 2004063, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    6. Drehmann, Mathias & Oechssler, Jorg & Roider, Andreas, 2007. "Herding with and without payoff externalities -- an internet experiment," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 391-415, April.
    7. Tatsuhiro SHICHIJO & Yuji NAKAYAMA, 2004. "A Way To Sell Goods With Network Externalities," Econometric Society 2004 Far Eastern Meetings 711, Econometric Society.
    8. Hüning, Hendrik & Meub, Lukas, 2015. "Optimal public information dissemination: Introducing observational learning into a generalized beauty contest," HWWI Research Papers 169, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    9. Yorulmazer, Tanju, 2003. "Herd Behavior, Bank Runs and Information Disclosure," MPRA Paper 9513, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. repec:spr:joecth:v:65:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00199-016-1014-z is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Henry Cao & David Hirshleifer, 2004. "Taking the Road Less Traveled: Does Conversation Eradicate Pernicious Cascades?," Game Theory and Information 0412001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Hüning, Hendrik & Meub, Lukas, 2015. "Optimal public information dissemination: Introducing observational learning into a generalized beauty contest," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 260, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.

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