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Split-Proof Probabilistic Scheduling

  • Moulin, Herve

    (Rice U)

If shortest jobs are served first, splitting a long job into smaller jobs reported under different aliases can reduce the actual wait until completion. If longest jobs are served first, the dual maneuver of merging several jobs under a single reported identity is profitable. Both manipulations can be avoided if the scheduling order is random, and users care only about the expected wait until completion of their job. The Proportional rule stands out among rules immune to splitting and merging. It draws the job served last with probabilities proportional to size, then repeats among the remaining jobs. Among split-proof scheduling rules constructed in this recursive way, it is characterized by either one of the three following properties: an agent with a longer job incurs a longer delay; total expected delay is at most twice optimal delay; the worst expected delay of any single job is at most twice the smallest feasible worst delay. A similar result holds within the natural family of separable rules.

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Paper provided by Rice University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2004-06.

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Date of creation: Mar 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ecl:riceco:2004-06
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  1. Manipushpak Mitra, 2001. "Mechanism design in queueing problems," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 277-305.
  2. Moulin, Herve, 2005. "Minimizing the Worst Slowdown: Off-Line and On-Line," Working Papers 2005-03, Rice University, Department of Economics.
  3. Kittsteiner, Thomas & Moldovanu, Benny, 2004. "Priority Auctions and Queue Disciplines that Depend on Processing Time," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 5, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
  4. Moulin, Herve, 1985. "Egalitarianism and Utilitarianism in Quasi-linear Bargaining," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(1), pages 49-67, January.
  5. Maniquet, Francois, 2003. "A characterization of the Shapley value in queueing problems," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 90-103, March.
  6. Moulin, Herve & Stong, Richard, 2001. "Fair Queuing and Other Probabilistic Allocation Methods," Working Papers 2000-09, Rice University, Department of Economics.
  7. Flip Klijn & Estela S?chez, 2004. "Sequencing Games without Initial Order," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 622.04, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  8. Hain, Roland & Mitra, Manipushpak, 2004. "Simple sequencing problems with interdependent costs," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 271-291, August.
  9. Moulin, Herve & Sprumont, Yves, 2003. "On Demand Responsiveness in Additive Cost Sharing," Working Papers 2003-10, Rice University, Department of Economics.
  10. Hervé Moulin, 2002. "The proportional random allocation of indivisible units," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 381-413.
  11. Sprumont, Yves, 1998. "Ordinal Cost Sharing," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 126-162, July.
  12. Curiel, Imma & Pederzoli, Giorgio & Tijs, Stef, 1989. "Sequencing games," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 344-351, June.
  13. Biung-Ghi Ju, 2003. "Manipulation via merging and splitting in claims problems," Review of Economic Design, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 205-215, October.
  14. Manipushpak Mitra, 2000. "Achieving the First Best in Sequencing Problems," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers bgse11_2001, University of Bonn, Germany.
  15. M. Angeles de Frutos, 1999. "Coalitional manipulations in a bankruptcy problem," Review of Economic Design, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 255-272.
  16. Fishburn, Peter C., 1992. "Induced binary probabilities and the linear ordering polytope: a status report," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 67-80, February.
  17. Moulin, Herve, 2004. "On Scheduling Fees to Prevent Merging, Splitting and Transferring of Jobs," Working Papers 2004-04, Rice University, Department of Economics.
  18. Curiel, I. & Pederzoli, G. & Tijs, S.H., 1989. "Sequencing games," Other publications TiSEM cd695be5-0f54-4548-a952-2, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
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