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Modelling the time varying determinants of portfolio flows to emerging markets

  • Lo Duca, Marco

This paper studies how the drivers of portfolio flows change across periods with a model where regression coefficients endogenously change over time in a continuous fashion. The empirical analysis of daily equity portfolio flows to emerging markets shows that the regression coefficients display substantial time variation. Major changes in the importance of the drivers of the flows coincide with important market events/shocks. Overall, investors pay more attention to regional developments in emerging markets in periods when market tensions are elevated. However, extreme tensions generate panics, i.e. periods when changes in uncertainty and risk aversion drive flows, while regional developments play only a marginal role. JEL Classification: F32, F34, G01, G11

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Paper provided by European Central Bank in its series Working Paper Series with number 1468.

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Date of creation: Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20121468
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  1. Geert Bekaert & Marie Hoerova & Marco Lo Duca, 2010. "Risk, Uncertainty and Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 16397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Forbes, Kristin J. & Warnock, Francis E., 2012. "Capital flow waves: Surges, stops, flight, and retrenchment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 235-251.
  3. Giovanni Dell'Ariccia & Paolo Mauro & André Faria & Jonathan David Ostry & Julian di Giovanni & Martin Schindler & M. Ayhan Kose & Marco Terrones, 2008. "Reaping the Benefits of Financial Globalization," IMF Occasional Papers 264, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
  5. Chuhan, Punam & Claessens, Stijn & Mamingi, Nlandu, 1998. "Equity and bond flows to Latin America and Asia: the role of global and country factors," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 439-463, April.
  6. Mody, Ashoka & Taylor, Mark P, 2003. "International Capital Crunches: The Time-Varying Role of Informational Asymmetries," CEPR Discussion Papers 3757, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Fratzscher, Marcel, 2011. "Capital flows, push versus pull factors and the global financial crisis," Working Paper Series 1364, European Central Bank.
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