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Liquidity Supply across Multiple Trading Venues

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Abstract

Financial markets are increasingly fragmented. How to supply liquidity in this environment? Using an inventory model, we analyze how two strategic intermediaries compete across two venues that can be hit simultaneously by liquidity shocks of equal or opposite signs. Although order flow is fragmented ex-ante, we show that intermediaries might strategically consolidate it ex-post, improving global liquidity. We also fi nd that local spreads co-move together across venues as a result of global inventory management. Using Euronext proprietary data, we uncover new evidence of inventory control across venues and fi nd that local spreads vary in a way uniquely predicted by the model.

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  • Lescourret, Laurence & Moinas, Sophie, 2015. "Liquidity Supply across Multiple Trading Venues," ESSEC Working Papers WP1505, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebg:essewp:dr-15005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bjonnes, Geir Hoidal & Rime, Dagfinn, 2005. "Dealer behavior and trading systems in foreign exchange markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 571-605, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fany Declerck & Laurence Lescourret, 2015. "Dark pools et trading haute fréquence : une évolution utile ?," Revue d'économie financière, Association d'économie financière, vol. 0(4), pages 113-126.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market fragmentation; multi-venue market-making; bid-ask spreads;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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