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Does Governance Matter for Enhancing Trade? Empirical Evidence from Asia

  • Prabir De

    (Research and Information System for Developing Countries)

Registered author(s):

    The primary objective of this paper is to find whether or not the governance and institutions matter for enhancing Asias trade. In this study, we have performed a comprehensive empirical analysis of the linkages between governance and trade at the Asian subregional level. Our results indicate that all individual governance indicators except regulatory quality have significant impact on trade in Asia, of which government effectiveness is the most crucial for Asias trade promotion. One of the conclusions of this paper is that soft infrastructure such as the institutions and governance are important for enhancing Asias trade. In other words, good governance and institutions help unlock trade potential of a region (or a nation). Improved governance, particularly at the sectoral level, can carry huge payoffs at a time when Asia is planning to pursue a free trade for the entire region. Ignoring governance weaknesses can stultify economic returns to free trade. Therefore, more effective policy approaches toward improved governance are needed to complement the regional trade policy in Asia and beyond.

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    File URL: http://www.eaber.org/node/22792
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    Paper provided by East Asian Bureau of Economic Research in its series Governance Working Papers with number 22792.

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    Date of creation: Jan 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:eab:govern:22792
    Contact details of provider: Postal: JG Crawford Building #13, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, Australian National University, ACT 0200
    Web page: http://www.eaber.org

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    1. Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Laura Alfaro & Vadym Volosovych, 2003. "Why doesn’t Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries? An Empirical Investigation," Working Papers 2003-01, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
    2. Joseph Francois & Miriam Manchin, 2007. "Institutions, Infrastructure, and Trade," IIDE Discussion Papers 20070401, Institue for International and Development Economics.
    3. Alberto Chong & Mark Gradstein, 2007. "Inequality and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 454-465, August.
    4. Kolstad, Ivar & Wiig, Arne, 2009. "Is Transparency the Key to Reducing Corruption in Resource-Rich Countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 521-532, March.
    5. Andrei A. Levchenko, 2004. "Institutional Quality and International Trade," IMF Working Papers 04/231, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Epstein, Gil S. & Gang, Ira N., 2008. "Good Governance and Good Aid Allocation," IZA Discussion Papers 3585, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Laura Alfaro & Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 2004. "Why does not capital frlow from rich to poor countries? An Empirical investigation," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 416, Econometric Society.
    8. Matthias Helble & Ben Shepherd & John S. Wilson, 2009. "Transparency and Regional Integration in the Asia Pacific," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 479-508, 03.
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