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Managing Capital Flows : The Case of the Philippines

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  • Josef T. Yap

    (PIDS)

Abstract

During the past five years or so, most East Asian economies including the Philippines experienced a rising level of foreign exchange reserves and rapidly appreciating currencies both in nominal and real terms. One cause has been the resurgence of capital flows, which makes the issue of how to manage them relevant. However, the experience with regard to capital flows among East Asian economies is mixed and the level of capital flows to the region is proportionally less than that prior to the 1997 crisis. Another reason is the rise in current account surpluses. The Philippines has experienced both a return of capital inflows and a more favorable current account balance, with the latter largely due to remittances from overseas workers. However, like many other regional currencies, the appreciation of the peso is not commensurate to movements of the BOP accounts. Currencies in the region are reacting primarily to the general weakness of the US dollar, and global uncertainties have contributed to weak investment which in turn is another major reason behind the current account surplus of several economies including the Philippines. Policy measures at the domestic level can focus on reviving private investment, particularly channeling overseas remittances to more productive investment. Meanwhile, East Asian financial and monetary cooperation can also result in a unified front aimed at overhauling the unipolar global financial system.

Suggested Citation

  • Josef T. Yap, 2008. "Managing Capital Flows : The Case of the Philippines," Development Economics Working Papers 22703, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:22703
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Guillermo A. Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman & Carmen M. Reinhart, 1996. "Inflows of Capital to Developing Countries in the 1990s," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 123-139, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yap, Josef T. & Cuenca, Janet S. & Reyes, Celia M., 2009. "Impact of the Global Financial and Economic Crisis on the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2009-30, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    2. Mercado, Rogelio, 2020. "Are capital inflows expansionary or contractionary in the Philippines?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign Exchange; Short-Term Capital Movements; International Finance;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F37 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Finance Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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