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Using Stated Preference Methods to Design Cost-Effective Subsidy Programs to Induce Technology Adoption. An Application to a Stove Program in Southern Chile

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  • Felipe Vásquez

    ()

  • Walter Gómez
  • Hugo Salgado
  • Carlos Chávez

    (School of Business and Economics, Universidad del Desarrollo)

Abstract

We study the design of an economic incentive based program –a subsidy- to induce adoption of more efficient technology in a pollution reduction program in southern Chile. Stated preferences methods, contingent valuation (CV), and choice experiment (CE) are used to estimate the probability of adoption and the willingness to share the cost of a new technology by a household.

Suggested Citation

  • Felipe Vásquez & Walter Gómez & Hugo Salgado & Carlos Chávez, 2013. "Using Stated Preference Methods to Design Cost-Effective Subsidy Programs to Induce Technology Adoption. An Application to a Stove Program in Southern Chile," Past Working Papers 12, Universidad del Desarrollo, School of Business and Economics, revised 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:dsr:pastwp:12
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Stated preferences; cost-effectiveness; environmental policy; urban pollution; households; contingent valuation; choice experiments.;

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