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Has the Increased Attachment of Women to the Labor Market Changed a Family's Ability to Smooth Income Shocks?

Listed author(s):
  • Olga Gorbachev

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Delaware)

An increase in a married woman's attachment to the labor market affected her family's ability to smooth unexpected income shocks. Between 1970 and 1990, the sharp rise in labor market attachment provided an increasingly important channel for smoothing shocks to spousal income. As the participation rate stabilized, this contribution to smoothing evened out. In the Great Recession, both spouses received negative income shocks, and access to transfer income became the main insurance mechanism. Volatility of consumption followed volatility of family income trends but at a lower magnitude. Families ability to weather income shocks didn't change during the 1970-2010 period.

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File URL: http://www.lerner.udel.edu/sites/default/files/ECON/PDFs/RePEc/dlw/WorkingPapers/2016/UDWP2016-03.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Delaware, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 16-03.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: 2016
Handle: RePEc:dlw:wpaper:16-03
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Purnell Hall, Newark, Delaware 19716

Phone: (302) 831-2565
Fax: (302) 831-6968
Web page: http://lerner.udel.edu/departments/economics/department-economics/

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  1. Jason DeBacker & Bradley Heim & Vasia Panousi & Shanthi Ramnath & Ivan Vidangos, 2013. "Rising Inequality: Transitory or Persistent? New Evidence from a Panel of U.S. Tax Returns," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(1 (Spring), pages 67-142.
  2. Olga Gorbachev, 2011. "Did Household Consumption Become More Volatile?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2248-2270, August.
  3. Orazio Attanasio & Luigi Pistaferri, 2014. "Consumption Inequality over the Last Half Century: Some Evidence Using the New PSID Consumption Measure," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(5), pages 122-126, May.
  4. Dynan Karen & Elmendorf Douglas & Sichel Daniel, 2012. "The Evolution of Household Income Volatility," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-42, December.
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