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What Determines the Demand for Occupational Pensions in Germany?

  • Kathrin Dummann

Demographic change causes an undersupply of financial old age benefits within the statutory pay-as-you-go pension system in Germany. Therefore, the provision of occupational as well as private pensions has to be enhanced. However, there seems to be an undersupply of occupational pension provision particularly in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). Using survey data of the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) and the German SAVE survey, the present paper studies econometrically the determinants of occupational pension provision in Germany. It shows that occupational pensions depend not only on supply-side factors such as firm size and industry, but also on demand-side factors such as individual socio-demographic attributes and people's savings motives.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.75177.de/diw_sp0067.pdf
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Paper provided by DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) in its series SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research with number 67.

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Length: 16 p.
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp67
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  1. Alessandra Guariglia & Sheri Markose, 2000. "Voluntary Contributions to Personal Pension Plans: Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(4), pages 469-488, December.
  2. Alan Gustman & Thomas Steinmeier, 1990. "Pension Portability and Labor Mobility: Evidence From the Survey of Income and Program Participation," NBER Working Papers 3525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Stuart Dorsey & Christopher Cornwell & David Macpherson, 1998. "Pensions and Productivity," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number pp, June.
  4. Richard Blundell & Martin Browning & Costas Meghir, 1993. "Consumer demand and the life-cycle allocation of household expenditures," IFS Working Papers W93/11, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Alan L. Gustman & Olivia S. Mitchell & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1994. "The Role of Pensions in the Labor Market: A Survey of the Literature," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(3), pages 417-438, April.
  6. David McCarthy, 2006. "The Rationale for Occupational Pensions," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 57-65, Spring.
  7. Rodepeter, Ralf, 1997. "Identifikation von Sparprofilen im Lebenszyklus," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 97-01, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universit├Ąt Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
  8. Blundell, Richard & Pashardes, Panos & Weber, Guglielmo, 1993. "What Do We Learn About Consumer Demand Patterns from Micro Data?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 570-97, June.
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