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How are pension integration and pension benefits related?

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  • Bender, Keith A.

Abstract

Pension integration is the ability to allow differentiated pension benefits across earnings groups. In the academic literature, it is often described as a way for firms to reduce pension benefits (and therefore costs). Justified by the requirement that firms pay half of Social Security payments, integrated pensions are typically found to reduce benefits for lower income workers. Data on retirees from the Health and Retirement Study, however, reveal a more complex picture where some individuals receive more benefits when one of their pension plans is integrated, ceteris paribus. Some reasons are discussed why this might be the case.

Suggested Citation

  • Bender, Keith A., 2009. "How are pension integration and pension benefits related?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 26-41, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:49:y:2009:i:1:p:26-41
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert C. Merton & Zvi Bodie & Alan Marcus, 1987. "Pension Plan Integration As Insurance Against Social Security Risk," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in Pension Economics, pages 147-172 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    3. Edward P. Lazear, 1985. "Incentive Effects of Pensions," NBER Chapters,in: Pensions, Labor, and Individual Choice, pages 253-282 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Garen, John & Berger, Mark & Scott, Frank, 1996. "Pensions, non-discrimination policies, and the employment of older workers," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 417-429.
    5. Joanne Salop & Steven Salop, 1976. "Self-Selection and Turnover in the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 90(4), pages 619-627.
    6. Stuart Dorsey & Christopher Cornwell & David Macpherson, 1998. "Pensions and Productivity," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number pp, November.
    7. Joanne Salop & Steven C. Salop, 1976. "Self-selection and turnover in the labor market," Special Studies Papers 80, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    1. repec:ora:journl:v:1:y:2015:i:2:p:237-246 is not listed on IDEAS

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