IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this book

Pensions and Productivity


  • Stuart Dorsey

    (Baker University)

  • Christopher Cornwell

    (University of Georgia)

  • David Macpherson

    (Florida State University)


Employers typically view their investment in pension plans as a means of providing retirement income for their workers. Economists, on the other hand, view pension programs as a way to increase workplace productivity. Dorsey, Cornwell and Macpherson explore the theoretical and empirical basis for the economists' perspective and, in the process, offer a complete discussion on the productivity theory of pensions.

Suggested Citation

  • Stuart Dorsey & Christopher Cornwell & David Macpherson, 1998. "Pensions and Productivity," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number pp, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:pp Note: PDF is the book's first chapter.

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: All books are copyrighted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cromwell, Jerry & Hurdle, Sylvia & Wedig, Gerard, 1986. "Impacts of Economic and Programmatic Changes on Medicaid Enrollments," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(2), pages 232-240, May.
    2. Parsons, Donald O, 1991. "Self-Screening in Targeted Public Transfer Programs," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 859-876, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Peter F. Orazem & Marvin L. Bouillon & Benjamin M. Doran, 2004. "Long-Term Attachments and Long-Run Firm Rates of Return," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(2), pages 314-333, October.
    2. Robert L. Clark & Joseph F. Quinn, 1999. "Effects of Pensions on Labor Markets and Retirement," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 431, Boston College Department of Economics.
    3. David McCarthy, 2003. "A Lifecycle Analysis of Defined Benefit Pension Plans," Working Papers wp053, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    4. Kathrin Dummann, 2007. "What Determines the Demand for Occupational Pensions in Germany?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 67, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Bender, Keith A., 2009. "How are pension integration and pension benefits related?," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 26-41, February.

    More about this item


    pensions; productivity; productivity theory of pensions; retirement income;

    JEL classification:

    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:pp. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.