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Technological Transitions and Educational Policies

Author

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  • Mario Amendola
  • Francesco Vona

    () (Sapienza University of Rome)

Abstract

This paper presents an out-of-equilibrium model to explain cross-country di erences in the capacity to absorb new skill-biased technologies. The usual mainstream viewpoint stressing the role of labour markets will be re-examined in a context characterized by a sequential structure of both the process of production and the skill formation, whose interaction brings about coordination failures harming the viabiity of the innovation process. In this light, educational policies play a crucial role in restoring the required coordination. The robust results of the simulations show that educational policies appear to be important both in rigid and in exible systems. In the former case, educational policies nanced by taxation allow the system to escape a low productivity nal equilibrium. In the latter, they contrast the nancial constraint associated to a large decrease in the unskilled wage. Altogether, a moderate degree of rigidity seems the most appropriate institutional environment to reach the targets of viability and of a full exploitation of the technological potential.

Suggested Citation

  • Mario Amendola & Francesco Vona, 2010. "Technological Transitions and Educational Policies," Working Papers - Dipartimento di Economia 9, Dipartimento di Economia, Sapienza University of Rome, revised 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:des:wpaper:19
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Davide Consoli & Francesco Vona & Francesco Rentocchini, 2016. "That was then, this is now: skills and routinization in the 2000s," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(5), pages 847-866.
    2. Mario Amendola & Jean-Luc Gaffard & Fabrizio Patriarca, 2017. "Inequality and growth: the perverse relation between the productive and the non-productive assets of the economy," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 531-554, July.
    3. Patriarca, Fabrizio & Vona, Francesco, 2013. "Structural change and income distribution: An inverted-U relationship," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 1641-1658.
    4. Mario Amendola & Jean Luc Gaffard & Fabrizio Patriarca, 2015. "Inequality and Growth : the perverse relation between the productivity and the non-productive assets of the economy," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-28, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    5. Francesco Gagliardi, 2014. "(English) Human capital policy and new European Social Fund Programme (Italiano) Politiche per il capitale umano enuova programmazione del Fondo Sociale Europeo," IRPPS Working Papers 61:2014, National Research Council, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Skill-Biased Technical Change; Labour Markets; Educational Policies; Out-of-Equilibrium Models;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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