IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cwl/cwldpp/2093.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Best and Worst of All Possible Worlds: Some Crude Evaluations

Author

Listed:

Abstract

The 2 x 2 matrix game plays a central role in the teaching and exposition of game theory. It is also the source of much experimentation and research in political science, social psychology, biology and other disciplines. This brief paper is addressed to answering one intuitively simple question without going into the many subtle qualifications that are there. How efficient is the non-cooperative equilibrium" This is part of a series of several papers that address many of the qualifications concerning the uses of the 2 x 2 matrix games.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael R. Powers & Martin Shubik, 2017. "The Best and Worst of All Possible Worlds: Some Crude Evaluations," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2093, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:2093
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://cowles.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/pub/d20/d2093.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nash, John, 1953. "Two-Person Cooperative Games," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 21(1), pages 128-140, April.
    2. Martin Shubik, 2012. "A Web Gaming Facility for Research and Teaching," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1860R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Jun 2013.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Dasgupta Siddhartha & Devadoss Stephen, 2002. "Equilibrium Contracts In a Bilateral Monopoly with Unequal Bargaining Powers," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 43-71.
    2. Delpeuch, Claire & Vandeplas, Anneleen, 2013. "Revisiting the “Cotton Problem”—A Comparative Analysis of Cotton Reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 209-221.
    3. Michele Lombardi & Naoki Yoshihara, 2020. "Partially-honest Nash implementation: a full characterization," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 70(3), pages 871-904, October.
    4. Britz, V. & Herings, P.J.J. & Predtetchinski, A., 2012. "On the convergence to the Nash bargaining solution for endogenous bargaining protocols," Research Memorandum 030, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    5. Sergiu Hart & Andreu Mas-Colell, 2008. "Cooperative Games in Strategic Form," Discussion Paper Series dp484, The Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
    6. Federico Di Pace & Matthias Hertweck, 2019. "Labor Market Frictions, Monetary Policy, and Durable Goods," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 32, pages 274-304, April.
    7. Carmen Herrero & Juan Moreno-Ternero & Giovanni Ponti, 2010. "On the adjudication of conflicting claims: an experimental study," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 34(1), pages 145-179, January.
    8. Shimer, Robert, 2006. "On-the-job search and strategic bargaining," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 811-830, May.
    9. Joan Esteban & József Sákovics, 2008. "A Theory of Agreements in the Shadow of Conflict: The Genesis of Bargaining Power," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 65(3), pages 227-252, November.
    10. Maria Montero & Alex Possajennikov, 2021. "An Adaptive Model of Demand Adjustment in Weighted Majority Games," Games, MDPI, vol. 13(1), pages 1-17, December.
    11. Enrico Saltari & Willi Semmler & Giovanni Di Bartolomeo, 2021. "A Nash Equilibrium for Differential Games with Moving-horizon Strategies," Working Papers 197, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    12. Xujin Pu & Lei Gong & Guanghua Han, 0. "A feasible incentive contract between a manufacturer and his fairness-sensitive retailer engaged in strategic marketing efforts," Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-14.
    13. Bergantiños, Gustavo & Vidal-Puga, Juan, 2010. "Realizing fair outcomes in minimum cost spanning tree problems through non-cooperative mechanisms," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 201(3), pages 811-820, March.
    14. P. Jean-Jacques Herings & Gerard van der Laan & Dolf Talman, 2000. "Cooperative Games in Graph Structure," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 00-072/1, Tinbergen Institute.
    15. Guth, Werner & Ritzberger, Klaus & van Damme, Eric, 2004. "On the Nash bargaining solution with noise," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 697-713, June.
    16. Scharpf, Fritz W. & Mohr, Matthias, 1994. "Efficient self-coordination in policy networks: A simulation study," MPIfG Discussion Paper 94/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    17. Fandel, Günter & Giese, Anke & Mohn, Brigitte, 2012. "Measuring synergy effects of a Public Social Private Partnership (PSPP) project," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(2), pages 815-824.
    18. Yoosik Youm & Edward O. Laumann, "undated". "Toward resolving the puzzle of the household division of labor: The role of trust in specifying neoclassical economic, power-dependency, and sex-role attitude explanations," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 2000-05, Chicago - Population Research Center.
    19. Milchtaich, Igal, 2004. "Social optimality and cooperation in nonatomic congestion games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 114(1), pages 56-87, January.
    20. van Damme, E.E.C., 2000. "Non-cooperative Games," Other publications TiSEM 51465233-a356-4d20-acc4-c, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    2 � 2 matrix games; Index;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:2093. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cowleus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Matthew Regan (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/cowleus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.