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The effect of supervision on Ph.D. duration, publications and job outcomes

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  • Stephane R. ROBIN

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

Abstract

The empirical literature on the market for PH.D. graduates is generally focused on individual characteristics and their effect on scientific achievement, career prospects and/or expected earnings. In this paper, we take a closer look at the context in which graduate training takes place. Using data on 650 Ph.D. graduates from the INRA (the French National Institute of Agronomic Research) we were able to show that supervision (described by characteristics of the Ph.D. lab) strongly affects the number (and quality) of articles published during the Ph.D., as well as its overall duration. Supervision also has a significant influence on job outcomes after the ph.D. has been completed.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephane R. ROBIN, 2002. "The effect of supervision on Ph.D. duration, publications and job outcomes," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2002041, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2002041
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    File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/2002-41.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Scott Stern, 1999. "Do Scientists Pay to Be Scientists?," NBER Working Papers 7410, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Sauer, Raymond D, 1988. "Estimates of the Returns to Quality and Coauthorship in Economic Academia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 855-866, August.
    3. Ehrenberg, Ronald G. & Schwarz, Joshua L., 1987. "Public-sector labor markets," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 22, pages 1219-1260 Elsevier.
    4. Levin, Sharon G & Stephan, Paula E, 1991. "Research Productivity over the Life Cycle: Evidence for Academic Scientists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 114-132, March.
    5. Ehrenberg, Ronald G, 1992. "The Flow of New Doctorates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 830-875, June.
    6. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Panagiotis G. Mavros, 1995. "Do Doctoral Students' Financial Support Patterns Affect Their Times-To-Degree and Completion Probabilities?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(3), pages 581-609.
    7. Ehrenberg, Ronald G & Schumann, Paul L, 1984. "Compensating Wage Differentials for Mandatory Overtime?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(4), pages 460-478, October.
    8. Stephan, Paula E., 2010. "The Economics of Science," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, Elsevier.
    9. Paul M. Romer, 2001. "Should the Government Subsidize Supply or Demand in the Market for Scientists and Engineers?," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 1, pages 221-252 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Hansen, W L, et al, 1980. "Forecasting the Market for New Ph.D. Economists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(1), pages 49-63, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Doctoral training; Skills acquisition; Entry on the labour market;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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