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Standard-of-Living Aspirations and Economic Cycles

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  • de la Croix, David

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) ; Belgian National Fund for Scientific Research (FNRS))

Abstract

Past experiences and social forces have been incorporated into tastes in order to analyze various microeconomic issues. We use these extended preferences to model the making of standard-of-living aspirations and study their effect on macroeconomic variables. We concentrate first on consumption behavior when there is habit formation. Such behavior is in accordance with several empirical facts and has important policy implications. Secondly, long term issues are analyzed assuming that children become habituated to a standard-of-living whilst still with their parents. This introduces a powerful mechanism responsible for long-term oscillations. We investigate in the third part whether habits applied to wage formation explain key labor market stylized facts.

Suggested Citation

  • de la Croix, David, 2000. "Standard-of-Living Aspirations and Economic Cycles," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2000008, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2000008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wadhwani, Sushil B & Wall, Martin, 1991. "A Direct Test of the Efficiency Wage Model Using UK Micro-data," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 43(4), pages 529-548, October.
    2. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer & Michael W. Klein, 2006. "Risky Habits: on Risk Sharing, Habit Formation, and the Interpretation of International Consumption Correlations," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(4), pages 722-740, September.
    3. Jean-Pierre Urbain & Franz Palm & David de la Croix, 2000. "Labor market dynamics when effort depends on wage growth comparisons," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 25(3), pages 393-419.
    4. John Campbell & Angus Deaton, 1989. "Why is Consumption So Smooth?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(3), pages 357-373.
    5. de la Croix, David & Michel, Philippe, 1997. "Altruism and self-refrain," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 1998010, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES), revised 00 Apr 1998.
    6. Aylin Seckin, 2000. "Consumption with Habit Formation," CIRANO Working Papers 2000s-39, CIRANO.
    7. Reichlin, Pietro, 1986. "Equilibrium cycles in an overlapping generations economy with production," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 89-102, October.
    8. Constantinides, George M, 1990. "Habit Formation: A Resolution of the Equity Premium Puzzle," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(3), pages 519-543, June.
    9. Martin S. Eichenbaum & Lars Peter Hansen & Kenneth J. Singleton, 1988. "A Time Series Analysis of Representative Agent Models of Consumption and Leisure Choice Under Uncertainty," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(1), pages 51-78.
    10. Jan Reijnders, 1990. "Long Waves in Economic Development," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 366.
    11. van Ewijk, Casper, 1982. "A Spectral Analysis of the Kondratieff-Cycle," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(3), pages 468-499.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mohamed Jellal & Francois-Charles Wolff, 2002. "Altruistic Bequests with Inherited Tastes," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 1(2), pages 95-113, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tastes; habit formation; cycles; fair wage; catching-up;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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