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When bigger isn’t better: Bail outs and bank behaviour

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  • Li, Han Hao
  • Miller, Marcus
  • Zhang, Lei

Abstract

The traditional theory of commercial banking explains maturity transformation and liquidity provision assuming no asymmetric information and no excess profits. It captures the possibility of bank runs and business cycle risk; but it ignores the moral hazard problems connected with risk-taking by large banks counting on state bail outs. In this paper market concentration and risk-shifting is incorporated in an analytically tractable fashion; and the modified framework is used to consider measures to restore competition and stability--including, in particular, those recommended for the UK by the Independent Commission on Banking (2011), chaired by Sir John Vickers.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Han Hao & Miller, Marcus & Zhang, Lei, 2011. "When bigger isn’t better: Bail outs and bank behaviour," CEPR Discussion Papers 8602, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8602
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Powell & Marcus Miller & Antonia Maier, 2011. "Prudent Banks and Creative Mimics: Can We Tell the Difference?," Research Department Publications 4760, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Marcus Miller & Lei Zhang, 2013. "The Invisible Hand And The Banking Trade: Seigniorage, Risk-Shifting, And More," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 56(3-4), pages 365-388.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    bailouts; money and banking; regulation; risk-taking; seigniorage;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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