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On the Nature, Modeling, and Neural Bases of Social Ties

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  • Ridderinkhof, Richard
  • Stallen, Mirre
  • van Winden, Frans A.A.M.

Abstract

This paper addresses the nature, formalization, and neural bases of (affective) social ties and discusses the relevance of ties for health economics. A social tie is defined as an affective weight attached by an individual to the well-being of another individual (‘utility interdependence’). Ties can be positive or negative, and symmetric or asymmetric between individuals. Characteristic of a social tie, as conceived of here, is that it develops over time under the influence of interaction, in contrast with a trait like altruism. Moreover, a tie is not related to strategic behavior such as reputation formation but seen as generated by affective responses. A formalization is presented together with some supportive evidence from behavioral experiments. This is followed by a discussion of related psychological constructs and the presentation of suggestive neural findings, based on the existing literature. We conclude with some suggestions for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Ridderinkhof, Richard & Stallen, Mirre & van Winden, Frans A.A.M., 2008. "On the Nature, Modeling, and Neural Bases of Social Ties," CEPR Discussion Papers 6950, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6950
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dittrich, Dennis A.V. & Büchner, Susanne & Kulesz, Micaela M., 2015. "Dynamic repeated random dictatorship and gender discrimination," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 81-90.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Affect; Modeling; Neuroeconomics; Social Ties;

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • D87 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Neuroeconomics
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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