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Title of Paper: Diversity, Immigration, and Redistribution

Author

Listed:
  • Stantcheva, Stefanie
  • Alesina, Alberto

Abstract

This paper provides a simple conceptual framework that captures how different perceptions, attitudes, and biases about immigrants or minorities can shape preferences for redistribution and reviews the empirical evidence on the effects of increasing racial diversity and immigration on support for redistribution

Suggested Citation

  • Stantcheva, Stefanie & Alesina, Alberto, 2019. "Title of Paper: Diversity, Immigration, and Redistribution," CEPR Discussion Papers 14254, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:14254
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Emmanuel Saez & Stefanie Stantcheva, 2016. "Generalized Social Marginal Welfare Weights for Optimal Tax Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(1), pages 24-45, January.
    2. repec:hrv:faseco:4553034 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Alberto Alesina & George-Marios Angeletos, 2005. "Fairness and Redistribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 960-980, September.
    4. Marco Tabellini, 2018. "Racial Heterogeneity and Local Government Finances: Evidence from the Great Migration," Harvard Business School Working Papers 19-006, Harvard Business School, revised Dec 2018.
    5. Alberto Alesina & Reza Baqir & William Easterly, 1999. "Public Goods and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(4), pages 1243-1284.
    6. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan, 2017. "Immigration in American Economic History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1311-1345, December.
    7. Erzo F. P. Luttmer, 2001. "Group Loyalty and the Taste for Redistribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(3), pages 500-528, June.
    8. Matz Dahlberg & Karin Edmark & Heléne Lundqvist, 2012. "Ethnic Diversity and Preferences for Redistribution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 120(1), pages 41-76.
    9. Alberto Alesina & Reza Baqir & Caroline Hoxby, 2004. "Political Jurisdictions in Heterogeneous Communities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(2), pages 348-396, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gründler, Klaus & Köllner, Sebastian, 2020. "Culture, diversity, and the welfare state," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 913-932.
    2. Sergei Guriev & Elias Papaioannou, 2022. "The Political Economy of Populism," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 60(3), pages 753-832, September.
    3. Maurice Obstfeld, 2021. "Globalization and nationalism: Retrospect and prospect," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(4), pages 675-690, October.
    4. Sergei Guriev & Elias Papaioannou, 2022. "The Political Economy of Populism," SciencePo Working papers Main hal-03874305, HAL.
    5. Lustenhouwer, Joep & Makarewicz, Tomasz & Peña, Juan Carlos & Proaño Acosta, Christian, 2021. "Are some people more equal than others? Experimental evidence on group identity and income inequality," BERG Working Paper Series 168, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    6. Matteo Gamalerio & Massimo Morelli & Margherita Negri, 2021. "The Political Economy of Open Borders: Theory and Evidence on the role of Electoral Rules," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 21157, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    7. Boadway,Robin & Cuff,Katherine, 2022. "Tax Policy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781108949453.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Diversity; Race; Inequality; Redistribution; Social preferences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • P16 - Political Economy and Comparative Economic Systems - - Capitalist Economies - - - Capitalist Institutions; Welfare State

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