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Ancestral characteristics of modern populations

Author

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  • Giuliano, Paola
  • Nunn, Nathan

Abstract

We construct a database, with global coverage, that provides measures of the cultural and environmental characteristics of the pre-industrial ancestors of the world's current populations. In this paper, we describe the construction of the database, including the underlying data, the procedure to produce the estimates, and the structure of the final data. We then provide illustrations of some of the variation in the data and provide an illustration of how the data can be used.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuliano, Paola & Nunn, Nathan, 2018. "Ancestral characteristics of modern populations," CEPR Discussion Papers 12909, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12909
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lam, Wing Man Wynne & Liu, Xingyi, 2020. "Does data portability facilitate entry?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 69(C).
    2. Gutmann, Jerg & Voigt, Stefan, 2020. "Family Types and Political Development," ILE Working Paper Series 34, University of Hamburg, Institute of Law and Economics.
    3. Desmet, Klaus & Gomes, Joseph Flavian & Ortuño-Ortín, Ignacio, 2020. "The geography of linguistic diversity and the provision of public goods," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C).
    4. Joseph Flavian Gomes, 2020. "The health costs of ethnic distance: evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 195-226, June.
    5. Qiang Li & Lian An, 2020. "Corruption Takes Away Happiness: Evidence from a Cross-National Study," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 485-504, February.
    6. Gutmann, Jerg & Voigt, Stefan, 2020. "Traditional law in times of the nation state: why is it so prevalent?," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 445-461, August.
    7. Johannes C. Buggle, 2020. "Growing collectivism: irrigation, group conformity and technological divergence," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 147-193, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cultural traits; Historical development; Persistence; Political Institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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